Author Topic: 2012 Triumph 675R  (Read 10744 times)

Offline IanC

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2012 Triumph 675R
« on: June 13, 2014, 11:43:42 pm »
As everyone knows I picked up a low mileage 2012 Triumph 675R recently.  I won't be doing much with this bike as it's pretty trick straight out of the box but I do enjoy being able to look back at the progress of my toys so here we are.

Numbers to watch:
Stock wet weight - 408 lbs
Current wet weight - 402 lbs
Stock max power - 126 bhp @ 12,600 rpm (@crank)
Stock max torque - 53.3 @ 11,900 rpm
Current HP - 111.2 (@wheel)
Current TQ - 49.26
Stock features:
Electronic intelligent quick shift
Ohlins forks
Ohlins TTX shock
Brembo mono block front calipers
Brembo front brake master cylinder
Carbon fiber fender, hugger,  inlays,  exhaust shield
Plan:
Have suspension set-up for me.  Factory default is 150lb which is nearly spot on.
Drop weight
Smooth out power delivery

Mods as of 3/15/16:
Akrapovic slip-on exhaust
TechSpec Snake Skin tank grips
Attack Performance rearsets
SuperSprox rear sprocket
Emissions/intake flapper/exhaust valve delete
Dyno tuned
Triumph solo cowl
Triumph carbon fibre sprocket guard
HID headlights
LED marker lights
Watsen Designs flush-mount front signals
Zero Gravity smoked windshield
EvoTech Fender Eliminator
Vortex hydraulic rear brake light switch
Woodcraft rear brake return spring
ProBolt 174mm shift rod
« Last Edit: March 25, 2016, 10:53:35 pm by IanC »
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline IanC

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Re: Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2014, 12:17:57 am »
A handy feature of the pre-2013 Triumphs is their unlocked ECU. This means that with the proper software and cable you can connect a laptop to the bike and monitor systems,  run diagnostics,  re tune the fuel map and even balance the throttle bodies.  More on that later.
This bike came with an EXUP valve.  It's a valve in the exhaust driven by cables connected to an electric motor.  It's based on technology Yamaha originally used to produce more torque but with modern fueling it's not used for performance gains.  On this bike it's used to quiet down the exhaust at low rpm. At roughly 6k rpm it opens up completely and everything runs as normal.  Below that and the valve is partially closed and the ECU compensates for the restriction. Basically,  it's dead weight.
I pulled the motor, cables and bracket off leaving the pulley and spring in place to keep the valve sprung in the open position. 
Now to prevent the ECU from popping up a CEL (check engine light) you have to disable the EXUP in the ECU.  You can see it has been unchecked in the TuneECU software there on the bottom left.

The graph you see there is the fuel mapping.  Another view here.

While I was in there I made sure the current map in the ECU is the latest version and the most optimal one available.
I'd already disconnected it but here is a view of the diagnostic screen.


So,  lost two pounds (sprung weight) and improved the low rpm sound. Not a bad start for free.
Updated first post with current weight.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline gotgixers

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2014, 12:38:12 pm »
That's cool Ian....good progress so far ... :21
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Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2014, 03:22:20 pm »
That's pretty interesting about the seemingly redundant exhaust valve. 

I know on the RG500 Gamma the exhaust valves (1 per cylinder) are there to primarily widen the power band by allowing the exhaust system to be tuned to more than one RPM.  Two strokes are a different critter with the highest performance exhaust having the characteristic small diameter "stinger" tailpipe capping a larger volume mid pipe.  The idea is that the exhaust is tuned to work optimally to flow a lot of gasses at a certain RPM to enable efficient cylinder scavenging and peak power.  The exhaust valves on the Gamma operate  at 7200 RPM to open small additional spaces in the cylinder heads to add internal volume to the system to retune the system to better suit higher RPM's. (For an example, think of a slide trombone and how moving the slide in and out retunes that exhaust system for different frequencies.) I would think that modern computer aided additional control over the ignition and fueling would not replace the benefit of being able to optimize the exhaust system for good flow and scavenging at  different RPM's even though they would plainly make two stroke fueling and lubrication less of a hit or miss affair.

I was under the impression that the original EXUP power valves for 4 strokes did something similar to adjust the exhaust flow to enhance the mid range.  But you seem to be saying that the ability to precisely adjust the ignition and fueling at any particular RPM make the ability to optimize the flow of the exhaust system at different RPM's unneeded.

Wouldn't an exhaust system that could be tweaked to work better at different RPM's still be a benefit?  Or am I missing something basic?
CHRIS
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Offline IanC

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Re:
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2014, 05:51:56 pm »
Potentially but I would think modern variable valve timing would be the more effective way to do that.

Edit: I did originally assume there would be some benefit but found a post referencing a Triumph developer that stated it was only for noise reduction and the fueling made it useless from a performance standpoint.

Double edit: I should also point out that the EXUP system is problematic and requires semi - regular maintenence or will fail altogether.  We can also call this a preemptive nip in the bud.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline IanC

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Re: Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2014, 08:31:11 pm »
Strictly cosmetic but the front reflector disks have been 86'ed.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 08:44:24 am by IanC »
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Marid2apterbilt

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2014, 08:38:19 pm »
When do we get the not-so strait up n down pics...
Quote from: Hot Blonde young Waitress
Fine dont eat my CUPCAKES then

Just because your a Touron doesnt mean we Locals should kiss your......

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Ha! Not gonna happen.

Offline IanC

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Re:
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2014, 09:16:35 pm »
When I get a chance to do more than commute.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Darren Burnett

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2014, 09:41:52 pm »
Major improvement ditching the reflectors....and that's huge considering I thought the bike looked outstanding as it was !!
2009 Suzuki Hayabusa-OEM tank emblems

Offline IanC

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Re: Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2014, 09:03:26 pm »
Before: Auto-ejecting signal stalks.


After: Fancy billet aluminum, color matched LED flush mounts.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2014, 09:31:00 pm »
 :21 Looks sharp!
Marc

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Offline gotgixers

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2014, 12:29:06 am »
Those look great Ian !!!


Nice score !!
I PITY THE FOOL, THAT DONT RIDE OLDSCHOOL


Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2014, 05:33:21 am »
When do we get the not-so strait up n down pics...

CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline IanC

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Re: Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2014, 07:21:21 pm »
Same guy was selling his Evotech tail tidy so I picked that up as well.
Before:


After:


1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline gotgixers

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2014, 08:26:20 pm »
Nice score as well ...
I PITY THE FOOL, THAT DONT RIDE OLDSCHOOL


Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #15 on: August 25, 2014, 10:13:32 pm »
Made a run up the Hill Sunday. Mainly just working on body position. My thighs were super sore today.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2014, 11:37:01 pm »
Made a run up the Hill Sunday. Mainly just working on body position. My thighs were super sore today.


The new front turns signals do look pretty unobtrusive.  Looking good Ian!

PS:  But why did you add all those "129 Slayer" decals to the bike?
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline gotgixers

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2014, 12:13:22 am »
Looking good Ian ... :n21
I PITY THE FOOL, THAT DONT RIDE OLDSCHOOL


Offline Sarge

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2014, 05:41:17 am »
Very nice. I like the 129 Slayer stickers.
Semper Fi

Offline IanC

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Re: Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2014, 08:56:34 pm »
Knocked out the 6k service this weekend and removed a bit more weight.
My lovely assistant:


Caution, nakedness.



After Audrey went off to bed someone took her place.


Changed the oil,  removed the IAS (essentially an EGR system), the charcoal canister/ purge solenoid and removed the intake flapper valve system.  
Then it was time to hook up the laptop.  Disabled the systems I removed in the ECU so no trouble lights would come on,  balanced the throttle bodies (using the computer software as the guage, see pic below) and then reset the adaptation (reset the TPS to baseline and let it relearn).

The 3 smaller guages on the left indicate vacuum.  Got them all identical which means the throttle bodies are perfectly in sync.


Everything that was removed.  I haven't weighed it yet but I estimate another 1.5 - 2 lbs. Took it for a spin to make sure all was well and the new intake growl is fantastic. I also found a headlight housing mount hole was cross threaded and the bolt wasn't in all the way which allowed the headlight to move and rattle.  Tapped the hole and fixed that.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2014, 08:59:07 pm by IanC »
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #20 on: September 08, 2014, 02:27:38 am »
Good work!  I bet the emissions haven't changed any appreciable amount with the loss of that system.  And while a pound or two isn't all that much every little bit helps.  But that's already an incredibly light bike.  After all, you and the Triumph together only weigh about the empty weight of your GS1000.

BTW:  I like your assistants.

Dad
« Last Edit: September 08, 2014, 02:29:19 am by Chris »
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline IanC

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Re:
« Reply #21 on: September 08, 2014, 08:32:32 am »
Also discovered that the rev limiter was set to 13,400 in the ECU. I had noticed that it seemed to hit early. Changed it to a more appropriate 14,700. Oddly, indicated red line is 15,200 but the ECU wouldn't let me adjust the rev limiter past 14.7k.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline gotgixers

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #22 on: September 08, 2014, 12:17:50 pm »
Very good work Ian ... :21
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Offline Deuce

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #23 on: September 09, 2014, 03:09:07 am »
 :pop  :21
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Offline BudLong

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2014, 06:47:56 am »
 :21
 :18
 :happyrider

Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #25 on: September 16, 2014, 02:08:40 pm »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2014, 09:58:22 pm »
Thanks for the clip. I understand why they made the changes they did for sure and if I were after a dedicated track bike the '13+ would be my go to choice but the look of the undertail and lack of the weird headlight 'wings' makes the -'12 perfect. I agree with pretty much everything he said about the 675R though. I can't imagine wanting anything more from a supersport bike. I love the lack of rider aids, I love the sound, the fantastic power delivery, the handling.  It's still foreign to me to walk out to the garage and to look at a bike and have to try  and think of something to do to improve on it.
I did notice in the clip the '13+ also include a Brembo rear caliper to go with the fronts, I hadn't know that and while it's a pretty pointless from a modification standpoint (the Nissin unit is more than up to the job) I wouldn't mind the extra bit of Brembo 'bling'. 
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2014, 10:21:01 pm »
The Triumph had a bit of a flat spot around 4-5k after removing the emissions stuff. Somewhat annoying as this is the cruise around town range. Took it to work and strapped it to the dyno there. One of the techs dialed everything in and fattened it up in that range and also towards the top where it was running a little lean as well. Pretty pleased with the way the bike feels now. It's much more crisp and responsive and it also grabbed a little more power all across the board.

Blue line was the first pull, red line is the final. Love the smooth power curve. The tech was obviously used to tuning HD's and had a good time playing with something a little more peppy.

« Last Edit: December 23, 2015, 12:35:30 am by IanC »
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline gotgixers

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #28 on: December 09, 2014, 10:41:55 pm »
NICE  :21
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Offline Deuce

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #29 on: December 13, 2014, 10:15:18 am »
 :21
2006 VTX1300C 205/70/15 Hydroedge rear tire, Leatherlyke Bags, Batwing, Cobra floor boards, Vance & Hines pipes, LEDGlow, Pair Mod, Kuryakin Hypercharger Pro, Mustang seat, Cobra passing lights, Cobra Case Gaurds, 3" Fork extensions, 1800C Shocks, Cobra Tach, Custom Risers, Custom Kickstand, and a  WOLO Badboy Horn.