Author Topic: 2012 Triumph 675R  (Read 11375 times)

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #30 on: December 23, 2015, 01:22:46 am »

The time has come for the Trumpets big 12K service so I'll be knocking that out as well as a couple other things. The biggest job in the 12k service is the valve adjustment so I dove into that first.

First things first, get the bike off the ground and ready to work on.


Then start stripping it.



Yet another reason I love Triumph, while removing the air cleaner I noticed 3 of the screws were very close to the throttle body inlets and I immediately worried about dropping one. While it likely would hit the butterfly and stop, why tempt fate? As I was about to go grab some rags to fill the inlets I noticed the air cleaner had a built in catch for those three screws so they wouldn't fall out. Can't really see it well in pictures but the darker spot around the screw is a tab to keep it in there.


12K air filter was starting to look a bit filthy, the outlet side still looked brand new so it seems to do the job.


Air box removed.


Pull the coils.


Removing the throttle bodies allowed me to check out the intake ports and I was pretty surprised at how smooth the ports were. Other than a bit of port matching Triumph didn't leave much to be done if head work is ever a necessity.


Valve cover off and ready to check the valves. The baby woke up about then so I'll get back to it tomorrow.

« Last Edit: December 23, 2015, 11:57:40 am by IanC »
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #31 on: December 24, 2015, 02:03:27 am »
So now it's time to check the valve clearances and some of mine seemed a bit loose so...
Pop off the right crank cover and align the dimple on the crank cam sprocket to the mark on the case and double check the cam gear marks to make sure everything is right.



Stick something between the cam chain guide and the case to keep pressure on the cam chain, a small 3/8" extension worked perfectly. Then remove the tensioner.



Loosen the cam bridge bolts in sequence and pull it off. Verify the spark plug tube o-rings and dowel pins are where they should be and didn't fall down. Inspect the cam journals to make sure everything looks normal. I noticed a little gouge mark on an intake cam journal but did not see a similar mark on the cam itself so I'm not going to worry about it.




Remove the extension that was locking the chain in place and remove one of the cams. I only needed to remove the intake cam . This gives you access to the buckets. I use a magnet in the center of the bucket to hopefully pull the valve shim out with the bucket like in picture 2.



In this case I was right on maximum spec of 0.20mm with a 2.55mm shim installed so I installed a 2.60mm shim to put it more towards the middle of the spec.



Repeat as necessary and then put the cam back in, aligning the cam gear marks carefully then put the bridge back. Make sure to torque it to spec in the proper order. It was a good chance to use my new in/lb torque wrench. Was 1/2 off at Sears so I'm replacing my cheap Harbor Freight one. About now is when I was sent to the grocery store so more to follow later.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2015, 02:06:11 am by IanC »
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #32 on: December 28, 2015, 12:27:41 am »
Been mucking about with this off an on for the last few days when I had some spare time. Family left today (more coming in tomorrow) so I snuck out to the garage with my newest helper while the ladies slept.


Finally got the cam timing sorted out. That ended up being a bit of a pain. The set-up Triumph uses allows enough slack that the chain will jump on the intake sprocket before the cam chain tensioner takes up the slack. Then you have to take everything back down and try again. It took me a few tried to figure that out as I had my eye on the crank timing marks while I was turning the crank. Once I figured out what was happening I zip tied the chain to each cam gear and instead of retracting the tensioner fully I left a little so it would provide some tension on the first couple revolutions.

I'd love to say I was able to button that part of the service up but I can't. Out local Triumph dealership is a joke. To make life easier on their customers and technicians Triumph provides service kits. Everything you need for a big service under one part number. I assume this would be stocked in every dealer. Wrong. I called Honda/Yamaha Knoxville and told them I needed said kit and was told they didn't have it but should have all the individual parts. Ok, maybe they are out of the kit. I told them I'd be there in a bit and drove the 40 minutes to go pick up the parts. I get there and once again tell them I need the service kit hoping that whomever I talked to just didn't know. This guy tells me' "We don't do kits." Why, WHY would you not take advantage of the kit that includes all your customers and techs need for a common service?! Ok, whatever I'll take the individual parts. He starts bringing parts one at a time. Oil filter, check, drain plug gaskets, check, "Would you like me to order the spark plugs?". All I could do was blankly stare. Told him I'll pass, go home and order the singular part number for everything on-line. This is the 3rd time I've been to that dealer needing something and the 3rd time I've left angry. It'll be my last time as well.

So while I wait for my order from BikeBandit I started on the flushing the coolant system. Here I found what appears to be bits of plastic in the coolant and stuck to the radiator cap. There was also an accumulation of ...something in the bottom of the reservoir. Removed the reservoir and cleaned it out.




Before I can fill the system back up I need the coolant drain plg gasket in the kit as well so that's where I stopped for the night. If the parts don't coming in tomorrow I'll probably start on flushing and bleeding the brakes.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #33 on: December 28, 2015, 03:36:14 am »
Good work son!  I love the pic of Andrew in the garage, which brings back lots of memories of you in the garage when you were small.

I'd find that cam bearing journal wear worrisome but since the cam is riding in the head itself I'm not sure what realistically can be done about it. 

As to your frustrating exchange with the Triumph dealer concerning the service kit, it seems to me that they are blatantly gouging the customer by their refusal to order or sell the service kit (a legitimate Triumph spare part number!) since my assumption would be that they make more money by selling the individual items.  If I were you, I'd contact Triumph to complain and post on Triumph forums about the dealer's unfair practices and encourage others to contact Triumph as well.  Probably won't make them lose the franchise but might earn them an embarrassing phone call from Triumph calling them on the practice.   

Since you were able to order the service kit from an online retailer like Bike Bandit you might try this.  Forward the emailed order confirmation to the dealership with the comment that you would have preferred to deal locally but because they wouldn't sell you the part that you, the customer, wanted they left you no option but to do your business online.  Perhaps watching dollars flow to an online source because of their foolish policy will give them second thoughts.

I'd like to think that by being an activist consumer you could influence their policy.  If they were even half smart it would.  But I doubt it will because if those clowns don't stock common service items such as spark plugs they're complete asshats anyway.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2015, 05:48:34 am by Chris »
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Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #34 on: December 28, 2015, 09:33:07 am »
Good work son!  I love the pic of Andrew in the garage, which brings back lots of memories of you in the garage when you were small.

I'd find that cam bearing journal wear worrisome but since the cam is riding in the head itself I'm not sure what realistically can be done about it. 

Audrey got her first small tool set for Christmas and has been helping as well. I usually can't be in the garage without her too.

That was my thinking on the cam journal as well so I made sure they were all liberally lubed and I guess we'll see what they look like in another 12,000 miles.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #35 on: December 28, 2015, 10:29:05 am »
Audrey got her first small tool set for Christmas and has been helping as well. I usually can't be in the garage without her too.

I'm quoting your Mum who's looking over my shoulder here:  "Cool!  The family that works on motorcycles together stays together.   Those are the facts according to motorcycle statistics."

I'm not sure where she found her data but as it agrees with my prejudices I'll go along whole heartedly.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2015, 12:06:00 pm by Chris »
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Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #36 on: December 28, 2015, 11:51:55 pm »
Knocked out the front and rear brake flush tonight. This is a pretty standard ordeal so not many pictures. Audrey was out helping me and then working on her own 'cycle'.



Old fluid, new fluid and a must have for brake bleeding. Makes life much easier. Kris accidentally killed my last one so I had to run out and get a new one.




Started lubing and adjusting cables. Make sure you cover everything in the surrounding area or you'll have a hell of a mess.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #37 on: December 29, 2015, 06:56:27 am »
I'm liking this Ian.Interesting for sure and you've got a heck of a pit crew going there.
Marc

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Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #38 on: December 29, 2015, 09:15:43 am »
Notes on recent photos:

I like the look of concentration on Audrey's face as she works.

Nice dresses (or nice clothes in general) are not good garage attire for kinder.  In my experience moms get surly when grease and oil spots appear on a nice outfit.  I don't know why.  I've actually experienced this several times so I know it's true though.

I like DOT 5 brake fluid a lot despite the stories about the problems with it.  I've never had a problem with it but then I always flushed the system pretty thoroughly when I switched over to DOT 5.  Having to repaint the Beemer (big $$) because a ruptured front brake line sprayed DOT 3 over the fairing and tank and repeatedly rebuilding corroded brake systems in Britain probably accounts for a lot of that preference. I did find that DOT 5 is a bit more finicky to bleed but you already have the right tool for that.

Yes to the big mess potential for lubing the cables but count your lucky stars that you live in the world of the aerosol spray can. In the old days before spray lubes bowden cables* had to be disconnected, hung vertically, and little paper funnels formed around the top end of the cable.  You'd then pour oil into the funnel and wait for it to soak down into the cable sheath lubing the inner cable as it seeped.  Big mess, time consuming and right up there with periodically "decoking" the engine top end and cooking the drive chain in hot grease on a stove top as tasks I'm glad motorcyclists no longer have to worry about much.  Can you tell I often hung with the old guys when I was riding in Britain?

Thanks for posting these photos...I'm loving them.

Dad

* named for their inventor, Bowden, an Irishman living in London in the 1890's and first noted in use on early automobiles around the turn of the century.  Think of them as an early Irish fly by wire system.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2015, 09:27:58 am by Chris »
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #39 on: December 29, 2015, 10:07:19 am »
Audrey usually wears jeans or overalls in the garage if we'll be doing anything she may get too dirty on. I love my coated garage floor because I can keep it and by extension myself clean.
I usually use DOT 5 but this bike will be on the track next season. While I highly doubt I would get the brakes hot enough to surpass DOT 5's lower boiling point, that was my reasoning behind using Castrol's GT Lima Synthetic DOT 4. Future track use played a part in a few decisions of this service. The tires I ordered are not my usual go to Michelin sport touring tires, instead I opted to try the Dunlop Q3's. I was hesitant to try them over using the Pilot Power 3's but I've read/heard good things about them so we'll try  them out. Once again, will my riding exceed the abilities of the PR4's? Not at all. I'll also be using Engine Ice coolant as it's on the Sportbike Track Time list of approved coolants.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #40 on: December 29, 2015, 04:08:03 pm »
I'll also be using Engine Ice coolant as it's on the Sportbike Track Time list of approved coolants.

I've never used Engine Ice but I've seen it in the stores.  I have used Water Wetter but to tell you the truth I couldn't tell any difference between it and regular coolant as far as engine temps went so I'm a little sceptical about enhanced coolants.  I'll be interested to see if the Engine Ice actually makes a difference.
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #41 on: December 29, 2015, 04:22:50 pm »
I've never used Engine Ice but I've seen it in the stores.  I have used Water Wetter but to tell you the truth I couldn't tell any difference between it and regular coolant as far as engine temps went so I'm a little sceptical about enhanced coolants.  I'll be interested to see if the Engine Ice actually makes a difference.

If it lowers temps that will just be an added bonus. Just using it because I can't use the OEM coolant and Engine Ice still had decent anti-freeze properties.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #42 on: December 29, 2015, 09:52:20 pm »
Tires came in at work today so I dropped the wheels off the bike and will take them in tomorrow to have the new tires shoed on. My PR4's have roughly 10k miles on them and aren't quite down to the wear bars but the rear is very close.
Front


Rear



I had picked up these stands from E-bay for about $130. I was concerned with the quality given the price but they had good reviews so I gave them a shot. So far they have done really well. I'll do a review and provide a link after I'm done with the service.

1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Deuce

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #43 on: December 29, 2015, 11:03:01 pm »
 :pop
2006 VTX1300C 205/70/15 Hydroedge rear tire, Leatherlyke Bags, Batwing, Cobra floor boards, Vance & Hines pipes, LEDGlow, Pair Mod, Kuryakin Hypercharger Pro, Mustang seat, Cobra passing lights, Cobra Case Gaurds, 3" Fork extensions, 1800C Shocks, Cobra Tach, Custom Risers, Custom Kickstand, and a  WOLO Badboy Horn.

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #44 on: January 06, 2016, 11:11:09 am »
Unfortunately, not much for updates. Waiting for parts. A bit annoyed by BikeBandit as I just received notice that my order that I placed 12/23 just shipped and will be here 1/11. I would attribute to the holidays but this has happened with them before. I wish they had something that would pop up when you placed your order stating they have to order from the manufacturer and it will be delayed. Also waiting on my chain/sprocket set. It was on back order a couple weeks ago and when I contacted the manufacturer they stated it would be back in stock next week. It wasn't. So I found a retailer that had it in stock and ordered from them. I did get my new tires in and shoed on. One of my favorite things is new tires on the bike.


While figuring out where I wanted the ballasts for the HIDs I had the front fairing sitting in place. Of course it fell off. Was pretty miffed at myself. Scuffed the fairing and the windshield a bit so I picked up some cutting compound and buffed it out. If you knew where to look and looked real close in the right light you'd be able to see a pale scuff.


While I have the bike apart and not much going on I've been washing/polishing all the plastic/carbon fiber bits.

1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #45 on: January 06, 2016, 01:16:23 pm »
One of my favorite things is new tires on the bike.


Great photos and thanks for taking the time to put them up. 

I agree, new shoes for baby is a very good thing.  I'm always slightly amazed how much better a bike handles with fresh rubber restoring the profile.  The gradual loss of handling is so imperceptible that the sudden change back to working as the engineers intended is startling.

EDIT:  Rereading this post I realized that those three sentences sum up my reservations about people running car tyres on bikes.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 01:20:33 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #46 on: January 08, 2016, 10:38:07 am »
And my part woes continue.  My chain and sprocket set came in and there was a defect in the rear sprocket. 
I contacted the seller who stated they had never seen this from a SuperSprox and suggested I call SuperSprox. I left a message there and am awaiting a return call.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #47 on: January 08, 2016, 04:12:09 pm »
Sounds like my luck.Hopefully you get it straightened out and they do the right thing.
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #48 on: January 08, 2016, 04:41:13 pm »
I spoke with Jeff at SuperSprox today and he was very helpful. Said he'd be emailing me to get my information and would send out a new sprocket with a return label.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #49 on: January 08, 2016, 07:17:58 pm »
 :21
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #50 on: January 10, 2016, 11:45:38 pm »
I sneak out to the garage when I can to get some more work done. New front sprocket in stock gearing, I thought about going with a 15T for a bit better acceleration but decided I'd do a track day or two with the stock gearing first. I did go with a 520 chain and sprocket set though, down from a 525. I don't have my replacement rear sprocket yet but Jeff at SuperSprox told me it would be in the mail Monday.  I picked up some Attack Performance rearsets at a great price and they are really nice pieces. There are a few issues though. The shift linkage on the Daytona goes through the frame and most rearsets don't utilize this and instead use an external linkage. I like the fact that AP still runs through the frame in both standard shift and GP shift (I'm running standard shift.) Unfortunately, the shift linkage is binding on the frame. I did some research on this and others have just shimmed the mounting point of the rearsets with a couple washers. While this certainly would take care of it I don't really think I should have to modify the mounting on parts designed for my bike. I dropped AP an email and Gil replied almost right away requesting some pictures. I shot off some pics as well as a couple links to posts where others have had the same issue. Eager to hear back from him. In the mean time I can just shim it.



Another issue with these is that they are really a track oriented rearset and didn't have provisions for a rear brake light switch or even a return spring. Realistically I never use just my rear brake and the internal spring in the master returns the pedal well enough but this is a street bike and I do like to have everything functioning properly. A lot of people just zip tie the brake switch and return spring in place. I wasn't keen on that idea.  Woodcraft makes a return spring kit that mounts on the master cylinder itself between the body and the clevis so I picked one of those up. I also picked up a hydraulic pressure switch that replaces the banjo bolt that Vortex offers.




The connections on the stock brake light switch and the Vortex switch are different so I cut the terminal off the factory switch and soldered it onto the Vortex switch. I figured if I ever needed to go back to the stock rearsets I can either keep the pressure switch in the master or find a used factory switch pretty cheaply. In the last pic you can see the Woodcraft return spring on the plunger rod.






Out of curiousity I weighed the stock rearsets vs. the AP units. I actually thought the APs would be heavier than stock. Really they are probably nearly identical with the difference being the carbon fiber heel guards vs. the stock aluminum ones.



Also got the new DID chain on. The chain and sprocket kit I got came with a clip style chain, if this was a track only bike I would probably keep it to make gear changes easier but it's not so I ordered a rivet style link for it and put that in.


My service kit should FINALLY be here tomorrow so I'll be able to really start buttoning things up.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #51 on: January 11, 2016, 01:37:50 am »
Good job with the rearset installation, particularly the new return spring and brake light switch.  I've always preferred pressure switches anyway and your installation looks very neat.   :21


In most places the addition of a rear brake light switch wouldn't have been optional as you suggested it might be in Tennessee.  Almost every state and country I've lived in had some sort of periodic  (usually annual) vehicle inspection and working brake lights front and rear was always something that was checked.   

The German TUV inspection is brutal.  If you're putting a bike trough inspection your bike better be stock or you'll need to have the approval paperwork for every non stock part in hand.  Also, EVERYTHING is inspected with Teutonic thoroughness to include making sure your tyres are not only unworn but a matching set front and rear of the sizes and model recommended by the tire company for your bike.  For example, when I bought a Pilot Road 3 replacement rear for the Bandit a while ago the tyre shop had to call the distributor to see if it was ok to mix with the PR2 on the front.  If the distributor had said no the German solution would have been to replace the front too even though it wasn't worn out yet.  I imagine the TUV inspectors would just about have a fit and impound the bike if it showed up with car tires on it.

As a GI I have to put my bike through a very complete inspection on base but not as nit picky as the TUV.  I've seen bikes fail the base inspection for an inop license plate light but luckily I don't have to produce approval paperwork for all the Japanese aftermarket parts on my bike or anything like that.  I can get away with just putting the stock exhaust back on it.  The V&H pipe I usually have on it failed before I even started the bike the first year I was here when the inspector stuck a ruler down the pipe and failed it for not having any baffles.  No problem, that's why I kept the stock muffler in the first place.  I always needed the stock part to make it through the Japanese inspection.  The German fellas who run the base inspection like to kid me about how much quieter my bike seems in the inspection bay than when they see it in town.


« Last Edit: January 11, 2016, 01:43:50 am by Chris »
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Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #52 on: January 11, 2016, 01:37:37 pm »
Gil from Attack Performance called me today and we talked about the linkage issue. He thinks he has a  fix for it and will be sending me out some parts. Wants me to pull the rearset off when they arrive then call him and he'll walk me through where things go. Cool guy and great customer service. I will most certainly recommend both Attack Performance and SuperSprox as well as Rider's Discount where I've been getting a lot of the bits I need.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #53 on: January 11, 2016, 07:13:25 pm »
Good to see this is all coming together and looking good.Also encouraging to see good customer service from several vendors.
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #54 on: January 11, 2016, 08:44:50 pm »
Gil from Attack Performance called me today and we talked about the linkage issue. He thinks he has a  fix for it and will be sending me out some parts. Wants me to pull the rearset off when they arrive then call him and he'll walk me through where things go. Cool guy and great customer service. I will most certainly recommend both Attack Performance and SuperSprox as well as Rider's Discount where I've been getting a lot of the bits I need.

Good news.  I'm glad to hear about the good support for those products.  That would tend to make me a repeat customer in spite of the problems.
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #55 on: January 14, 2016, 10:18:33 am »
Well, another bad news day yesterday. I'd replaced my car tires a couple months ago and noticed that one was all but flat. I had the road hazard protection with the store that put them on so I took it back to them. Turns out the wheel is bent. So while I source a wheel I had to fast track finishing the bike.
It was pretty much done already but I won't get a chance to do the thorough cleaning and such. By 10PM I had it back together and fired up. Oil started leaking from a weep hole under the #1 exhaust port. Bugger! That weep hole serves as a drain for the #1 spark plug tube so the valve cover gasket may have shifted or pinched. Tore it all the way back down and by midnight had it all back together ensuring the gasket was in good shape and in the correct spot. Fired it up again and....leaking. @#*%! So... there are o-rings between the cam bridge and the head around the spark plug tubes and that's the only other place this could be coming from. I guess when I was pulling the bridge on and off repeatedly it may have pinched that o-ring.
That put me in a bit of a dilemma, my car wheel is hemorrhaging air and my bike is hemorrhaging oil.  The last factory Triumph parts I ordered from BikeBandit took over two weeks to get and if Knoxville Triumph has to order spark plugs the likelihood of them having these is pretty much nil and that's assuming I ever wanted to walk through their doors again. Jumped online mainly looking for a microfiche that uses stock Triumph part numbers (most companies change the numbers to their own numbers). Found one that I assumed was British based but as I'm looking up the parts I notice it's a site for a dealer in PA. Called them this morning with fingers crossed but expecting the parts to have to be ordered. They had them IN STOCK. Being shipped today 2-day priority.
So, if you need Triumph (or BMW) parts I recommend Hermy's Triumph/BMW out of Port Clinton, PA. 610-562-7303 http://www.triumphestore.com/ They will be my first call on parts from now on.
Now to find someone that repairs wheels....
« Last Edit: January 14, 2016, 10:20:45 am by IanC »
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #56 on: January 24, 2016, 06:20:10 pm »
I took pictures of the bike going back together but it's pretty much just the same as coming apart just backwards. If it really interests you that much just look at the pics in this thread in opposite order. I got my replacement sprocket quickly and I found my leak. An o-ring between the cam bridge and the head had gotten pinched. I got a little concerned when I only found about half the o-ring but after some searching I found the other half at the bottom of the spark plug tube. Had to get a sharp pick and fish around down there until I finally stabbed it and got it out. Replaced all the spark plug tube and dowel o-rings while I was in there. Cleaned up teh plastics and put it all back together.


12K service complete, solo cowl installed, HID headlights installed, chain & sprockets replaced with a 520 Supersprox kit, Attack Performance rearsets installed, Dunlop Q3 tires installed, Zero Gravity smoked windshield installed, Triumph carbon fibre "shark fin" sprocket guard installed.







I also got the update parts from Attack Performance but have not had a chance to install them yet.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #57 on: January 24, 2016, 07:32:05 pm »
Nice work and looking good.  Thanks for sharing.
Dad
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Deuce

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #58 on: January 24, 2016, 09:29:08 pm »
Very nice!
2006 VTX1300C 205/70/15 Hydroedge rear tire, Leatherlyke Bags, Batwing, Cobra floor boards, Vance & Hines pipes, LEDGlow, Pair Mod, Kuryakin Hypercharger Pro, Mustang seat, Cobra passing lights, Cobra Case Gaurds, 3" Fork extensions, 1800C Shocks, Cobra Tach, Custom Risers, Custom Kickstand, and a  WOLO Badboy Horn.

Offline IanC

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Re: 2012 Triumph 675R
« Reply #59 on: March 14, 2016, 08:42:14 pm »
Ditched the stock muffler and link pipe for a beautiful Akrapovic titanium/carbon fibre slip-on. The quality of this exhaust is amazing. Open the box and it comes with new hardware, detailed instructions with pictures & torque specs, even  some copper anti-seize.  The exhaust bracket is a work of art with gorgeous welds and laser etched logo.


Titanium link pipe with yet more of those impeccable welds.


Overall the slip-on shaved 4.2 pounds off the bike. That 4 pounds was also at the highest point of the motorcycle so it makes a pretty big difference in the feel of the bike.


You can also see in the last picture I picked up some TechSpec Snakeskin tank grip pads. This tank is slick, especially with leathers on and these pads make control of the bike much easier especially in twisties and hard braking.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R