Author Topic: Dealing with excessive heat  (Read 2054 times)

Offline Deuce

  • Poppa Deuce
  • Moderator
  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2962
  • I just love to ride and have since I was 5.
Dealing with excessive heat
« on: June 19, 2014, 03:25:27 am »
What tricks do you use to be able to stand the heat when it's in the 90's in the shade?
2006 VTX1300C 205/70/15 Hydroedge rear tire, Leatherlyke Bags, Batwing, Cobra floor boards, Vance & Hines pipes, LEDGlow, Pair Mod, Kuryakin Hypercharger Pro, Mustang seat, Cobra passing lights, Cobra Case Gaurds, 3" Fork extensions, 1800C Shocks, Cobra Tach, Custom Risers, Custom Kickstand, and a  WOLO Badboy Horn.

Offline emd513

  • speed is an obsession. not a decision.
  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2575
  • "adrenaline junkie"
Re:
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2014, 03:37:34 am »
Ride faster. Lol

Sent from my HTC6600LVW using Tapatalk
03 Zr1000. Totalled
04 Zr1000. Traded
05 gsxr 600 under construction
Sent from my HTC6435LVW using Tapatalk 2
[/quote]

Offline BudLong

  • True Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 482
Re: Dealing with excessive heat
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2014, 06:35:30 am »
My last boss had an ice vest.  it was something that had gel packs in it.  he would keep it in the freezer and wear it under his jacket.  the first time he used it he took it straight out of the freezer threw it on and took off.  after that he would let it sit for 10 - 15 minutes before putting it on.  and he would only put it on right when he was ready to get on his bike and go.

i don't have any experience yet with riding for any amount of time while it's hot.

Offline gl1dinorider

  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2704
Re: Dealing with excessive heat
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2014, 12:11:35 pm »
i just sweat more.

or find a shady road to ride on.

or ride down by the river.

but mostly, i just sweat more.
What does "riding season" mean?

Offline Chris

  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2067
  • curmudgeon in residence
Re: Dealing with excessive heat
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2014, 12:44:23 pm »
I was stationed in Texas for a couple of years and learning to ride in OMG heat was part of the deal.  A trick the local guys showed me was to stop every ten - fifteen miles or so to use the gas station water hose to wet yourself down.  Evaporative cooling would keep you comfortable until that next gas station.  These days, we have a little more sophisticated way of doing the same thing by using one of the wet vests made by several manufacturers.  I used one on a ride to Oklahoma City and San Antonio two summers ago.  Temps averaged in the high 90s on the way to OKC and went over 100 heading south to Texas.  I stopped every 60-90 minutes to top off the tank, rewet the vest, and drink some fluids.  The vest made the difference between the ride being a little warm or giving up and riding at night.  I keep one in the Beemer saddlebags these days.  NOTE:  Remember to take it into the hotel at night to rinse out and hang it up to air dry.
CHRIS
________________________

CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline DragonRider

  • True Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 633
  • Adventures we seek
Re: Dealing with excessive heat
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2014, 02:04:59 pm »
There are new shirt and pants materials like Heat-Out (Cycle Gear) and similar items like Coolmax (underarmor, I use the Coolmax and it works very well) that aid in evaporative cooling. They do rely somewhat on sweat to work the best and they do work under leathers.

The big thing when dealing with heat is hydration! I can'ts tress that enough: STAY HYDRATED!!!  If you start to feel headaches, your sight tends to drift out of focus, you have that dry scratchy bit in your throat or you suddenly feel hungry, DRINK! Find some place to get hydrated, carry extra water/sports drinks or use a hydration system like Platypus, OGIO, or Camelback. By the time a lot of people realize they are dehydrated their coordination, reflexes and thought process have already diminished quite a bit. Oh, and one needs not have these drinks at iced-levels!

For the rest, pick your battles. Super ultra hot day? Ride at higher altitudes or where there is likely to be more breezes. That failing, find a shadier area to ride if possible. Yes, I can understand that central states with 500 mile long straights without a tree in sight won't apply but at least here in East TN we have a dearth of choices in where to explore.

Take frequent breaks is another one. Also, if it's super hot outside really watch your tires and the tire pressures. They can swing pretty wildly on some bikes and the last thing you want is to be out in the sticks with no back-up supplies and a blown or blistered tire.

Offline littlebiglee

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 18
Re: Dealing with excessive heat
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2014, 12:17:10 pm »
I use a cooling towel made by Frogg Toggs under my jacket. I wet it down, throw it across my shoulders, put on my Jacket and am good for an hour or so depending on heat and humidity. When drinking fluids go light on the sports drinks and soda, they can work against you. I thin my sports drinks by at least half. Stay safe.

Offline Chris

  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2067
  • curmudgeon in residence
Re: Dealing with excessive heat
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2014, 02:24:52 am »
The big thing when dealing with heat is hydration! I can'ts tress that enough: STAY HYDRATED!!!  

Myk,

I couldn't agree more with what you're saying. Dehydration can sneak up on you. I crashed in the infield at Texas World Speedway during a four hour endurance race in the early 1980's and it was mostly because I was pretty cooked and not thinking or reacting well.  In the heat of getting the bike ready and swapping out riders and such I hadn't drunk enough fluids and during my stint in the saddle after about 40 minutes I fell and ended up in the hay bales.  I was so out of it I couldn't restart for about 10 minutes and just sat in the shade of the corner workers canopy and practiced my panting.

(When I made it back to the pits and handed off the little four hundred to the next guy I found my wife Rose busily making sandwiches for Ian and the pit crew.  When I told here I had crashed at the big infield loop she didn't even look up and said, "Oh, I thought we hadn't seen you for a while. Want a sandwich?")


Here in East TN we have a dearth of choices in where to explore.

Sorry, this is the English teacher coming out in me.  “Dearth” means scarcity or lack of something.  I’m pretty sure you mean abundance or surfeit.

Sorry, I couldn’t help myself.

Chris
« Last Edit: June 21, 2014, 03:05:26 am by Chris »
CHRIS
________________________

CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2067
  • curmudgeon in residence
Re: Dealing with excessive heat
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2014, 03:00:55 am »
When drinking fluids go light on the sports drinks and soda, they can work against you. I thin my sports drinks by at least half. Stay safe.


LBL,

(Sorry, I don't know your name)

I agree completely about picking your drinks carefully for hydration.  I think you can sometimes mix drinks.  I'm a coffee drinker and sometimes on a bike ride will go ahead and have that cup of coffee I want but also chug down a bottle of water to give my body what I think it needs.

Chris
CHRIS
________________________

CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline MikelJay

  • True Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 851
Re: Dealing with excessive heat
« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2014, 07:08:42 am »
Light colored clothing ( no black tee shirts, black leather, etc...... )

Lots of water. Like Myk said, stay hydrated!

As for me, I will wet my tee shirt, then put on my mesh jacket. Does a real good job of keeping me cool....    :D
Mike

2006 Yamaha Roadstar Silverado

Offline El Borrego

  • True Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1198
  • Seymour, TN
Re: Dealing with excessive heat
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2014, 07:45:00 pm »
I usually start off by drinking a bottle of water and try to drink one every couple of hours or some type of liquid.  Several people at the recent Valkyrie reunion was using a colored chamois like material they put in cold water and wrapped it around their neck.  Years ago we purchased some terry cloth type collars that you could put in cold water and wrap around your neck.  Helps cool the Carotid Artery blood circulation.  I've also seen people pour water over their heads and back.  I just drink water/liquids and ride.  As mentioned above there are a lot of new materials that are designed to wick the moisture away from your body and provide a cooling effect.  I haven't used any of those items so can't say good or bad about them.  The cool vests work for a while and when the ice/cold water warms up now you've got weight to contend with and it's no longer cold.  I just did a 618 mile one way run from Seymour to NW Arkansas.  It was a tad warm to say the least.  I did have to get out of my riding jacket as I was overheating my body on a couple of days, but kept it on while on the Interstate highballing.

Offline Chris

  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2067
  • curmudgeon in residence
Re: Dealing with excessive heat
« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2014, 04:11:18 am »
The cool vests work for a while and when the ice/cold water warms up now you've got weight to contend with and it's no longer cold. 

The cool vests that you soak in water, wring out and then wear are supposed to work by evaporative cooling.  Plainly, weather conditions can make a large difference in how well they work.  In high heat and low humidity, such as you'd encounter in Texas or Arizona, they work great as the water is evaporating quickly and thus a large temperature differential.  In high humidity and high heat, such as in the deep south or Japan, they work less efficiently.  I wore mine under a textile mesh riding jacket on the trip to Texas and Oklahoma. 
CHRIS
________________________

CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT