Author Topic: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History  (Read 14622 times)

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #180 on: November 19, 2017, 01:37:23 pm »
Not really a classic but I love this photo...

CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #181 on: November 19, 2017, 02:17:14 pm »
Interesting.Dragging knee while using a selfie stick.
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #182 on: November 20, 2017, 02:34:07 pm »
Interesting.Dragging knee while using a selfie stick.

Makes for a cool photo doesn't it?
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #183 on: November 20, 2017, 04:58:29 pm »
That it does.
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline Chris

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Snee Beemer
« Reply #184 on: January 27, 2018, 11:04:03 am »

As this lovely old BMW R60/2 shows us motorcycling continues even in the depths of winter.  This model was made from 1956 to 1969 and was designed for a specific purpose.  It was meant to be reliable, rugged transportation, often with a sidecar bolted on.  As a matter of fact, every /2 had permanent sidecar mounts on the frame and the Earles Fork front suspension was chosen for its suitability for sidecar use.  The engine was softly tuned for reliability with a 7.5:1 compression ratio that made it run just fine even on crappy gas.  Reliability was enhanced by the use of a magneto ignition.  Still, even with only 30 hp on tap the low weight of 430 lbs with the generously sized four and a half gallon tank full of gas meant the bike had perfectly adequate performance and exceptional range for the time.  The R60/2 was THE bike for touring riders from the late 50s to late 60s and also was widely used in Europe as a police bike.

How reliable were they?  Well, in 1974 a friend of mine bought one that had been sitting on a fellas back porch for 4 years.  We got there and the bike looked pretty sad.  We tried putting some gas in the tank but the fuel lines were dry rotted and just falling apart.  The battery was completely discharged of course and wouldn't take any sort of charge.  A quick trip to the parts store for some fuel line and five minutes work had new lines to the carbs installed.  The first kick just managed to spin the motor a bit.  The second kick spun it faster.  The third kick made it pop.  It ran on the fourth kick and lights came on.  Gotta love magneto ignition! He rode it home.

What are they like to ride?  Nice but different...no, REALLY different!  Starting it takes using the kick starter, like most bikes of the era, but to use the kick starter you need to be standing on the left side of the bike. I doubt it's possible to kick start one while on it. Once started they quickly settle down to a steady idle thanks to a fairly heavy flywheel.  On the road the bike feels good. The bike is fairly light to start with and what weight there is is very low, down around your ankles low.  So the bike feels very secure and really, not that different from your basic Schwinn.  On the other hand braking and accelleration feel pretty odd.  The Earles Fork and how the front brake stay works makes the bike rise under braking, exactly the opposite of what a telescopic forked bike does.  And when you give it the gas, especially at low speeds in the lower gears the pinion gear on the shaft tries to climb the gear in the rear end and once again, the bike rises by an inch or so.  So the seat of the pants feel of a /2 Beemer is quite different from chain drive bikes or even modern shafties since these quirks have been ironed out by modern manufacturers.

So, would I want one?  You bet!  After all, how many bikes from the 50s and 60s are reliable enough to take on trips?

« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 11:16:47 am by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #185 on: January 27, 2018, 07:16:07 pm »
i like the looks of it.You make me kinda want one with that sales pitch.
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #186 on: July 27, 2018, 12:50:39 am »
A couple of pics of one of my all time favorite bikes...the BMW R100RS


The first one I owned:



The one I own now:



What's happening under the skin:
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #187 on: July 28, 2018, 03:32:53 am »
Daytona...back in the day.




« Last Edit: July 29, 2018, 11:33:51 am by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline PAULRIDES

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #188 on: July 29, 2018, 10:04:24 pm »
Old stuff is kinda cool.  :happyrider
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #189 on: August 02, 2018, 01:01:04 pm »
Old stuff is kinda cool.  :happyrider


Your wish is my command!


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THE FLYING MERKEL - "THE NEXT THING TO FLYING"

Probably the coolest name every applied to an American motorcycle was “The Flying Merkel”.  But, sadly the name didn’t last very long as the ground breaking company was only in business for about 10 years before World War I. Despite that, it left quite a mark in our motorcycling world and is well remembered.  "The Merkel" brand first appeared in Milwaukee Wisconsin in 1902, when Joseph Merkel set-up shop producing single cylinder motorcycles. Merkel was among the most innovative of the pioneer motorcycle companies. By 1905 Merkel was building racing machines and was a leader in board racing until the company folded.  Merkel's motorcycles were to set many performance standards in the emerging American racing scene. These machines and their riders enabled Merkel to develop a patented spring front fork. This fork became the instrument of choice on racing machines of other builders and the suspension technology spread to road machines. Also, the monoshock rear suspension was developed, a similar system to that used today on modern motorcycles.

Maybe Indian or H-D could develop a line of sporting motorcycles and call them “Flying Merkels”?

By the way, google Margaret Gast for the story of an astounding young lady athlete who raced bicycles and motorcycles before becoming a motorcycle stunt rider. 







« Last Edit: August 02, 2018, 01:02:46 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline PAULRIDES

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #190 on: August 06, 2018, 10:06:31 pm »
Reminds me of something a cousin (4 years older than me) had at one time (late 1940s or early 1950s).

My memory may be off, but seems I was around 10 or 12 years old and he had a MC (??) with pedals. My Dad (not a MC Rider of any kind) jumped on it and all I remember is him yelling, "How do you stop it?"

Could be a memory thing on my part.  :banghead

 
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)