Author Topic: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History  (Read 14726 times)

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #60 on: March 03, 2017, 10:53:18 am »
I liked the Valk when it came out even if I wasn't riding at the time.A very cool bike that can be a cruiser or a very capable tourer.The CB will always be favorite amongst Honda folks.My first bike was a CB125S.As a teen I really wanted a 350 but that didn't happen.

I agree.  The Valkyrie Interstate was a very viable alternative to the Gold Wing.  I also agree the Honda CB series of bikes are evergreens and will always be popular with motorcyclists.
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Velocette
« Reply #61 on: March 03, 2017, 10:59:08 am »
VELOCETTE



Velocette isn’t a name heard very often these days but when I first was getting into motorcycling they had quite a reputation for making fast, good handling motorcycles that punched well above their weight class.  Velocette was founded in 1905 and was one of many motorcycle manufacturers from Birmingham, England.  They were a small family owned firm that produced what were essentially very high quality hand built bikes.  Most famous for their line of 500cc sporting singles, their bikes were just as their slogan said, “Always in the picture” and some of the finest English 500cc singles when those dominated sports motorcycling.  The firm was active in international racing from the mid-1920s thorough the 1950s and was a technical innovator with patented designs which are commonplace today like the positive stop foot shift and the swinging arm rear suspension with hydraulic shock absorbers. (In the photos below note the sliding track for the upper rear shock mount.  This is an easy and clever way to let the rider adjust the rear suspension.)  They won world championships in the post war 350cc Grand Prix class in 1949 and 1950.   The firm was also famous for setting a still unbroken world record for 500cc single cylinder machines over a 24 hour period averaging over 100 mph for the 24 hours.  This championship lineage showed up in the firm’s final Viper, Venom, and Thruxton models which were the final and best examples of the British sporting single.  The firm went out of business in 1971 under pressure from the Japanese motorcycle invasion which offered faster but poorer handling bikes for much less money.  But, even today a Velocette is a handsome and desirable machine.


 French 1970 Velocette Venom restored by Roland Chatokhine in 2005 for sale at Legend Motors in Lille














1969 Velocette Thruxton

« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 12:36:45 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline IanC

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #62 on: March 03, 2017, 01:38:54 pm »
Gorgeous bikes!
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #63 on: March 03, 2017, 02:45:28 pm »
Gorgeous bikes!

I've always thought so.  All the things you like about the new Royal Enfields with 20 more HP.  And if anything even prettier.
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #64 on: March 03, 2017, 06:45:26 pm »
Very interesting machines Chris.
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline Chris

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American Road Racing Dynasty
« Reply #65 on: March 04, 2017, 03:52:16 am »
AN AMERICAN ROAD RACING DYNASTY

Roberts-Lawson-Rainey

These days the motorcycle Grand Prix scene is dominated by riders from Spain but for 15 years starting in the late 1970s American riders dominated the Grand Prix premier class.  The three men in the photo above were the core of that American road-racing dynasty sharing 10 500cc championships between them.  Pictured at a Yamaha event during the last US Grand Prix at Laguna Seca are Kenny Roberts, Eddie Lawson, and Wayne Rainey.  They represent the best of the glory years of the 500cc two stroke era in World Championship history.


American 500cc World Champions 1978-1993

Kenny Roberts    500cc GP 1978-1979-1980  Yamaha

Freddie Spencer   500cc GP 1983-1985  Honda

Eddie Lawson     500cc GP 1984-1986-1988-1989  Yamaha Honda

Wayne Rainey      500cc GP 1990-1991-1992  Yamaha

Kevin Schwantz   500cc GP 1993  Suzuki

Here are some shots from their racing years...and later as the elder statesmen of their sport.


Wayne Rainey


Wayne Rainey 1991 Yamaha


Wayne Rainey 1993 Yamaha


Wayne Rainey at his home in Monterey.  The three certificates on his den wall behind him are from the FIM for each of his
world championships.  With him are Colin Edwards, Valentino Rossi, Kenny Roberts, and Kevin Schwantz.  Those five guys
have 17 world championships between them.




Eddie Lawson


Eddie Lawson 1985 Yamaha

Eddie Lawson 1989 Honda


Eddie at Yamaha’s 60th anniversary function




Kenny Roberts



Kenny Roberts 1980 Yamaha at Assen

Kenny Roberts 1982 Yamaha


Ken Roberts and an old friend

« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 06:44:22 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline SpareParts

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #66 on: March 04, 2017, 10:17:36 am »
I've never seen that kind of bike racing.  I've seen bikes run at the drags and I know about dirt bike racing but that's about it.  Is that stuff on TV?

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #67 on: March 04, 2017, 07:05:30 pm »
The only time I was in a position to follow the sport much was back when Miguel Duhammel(I probably butchered the spelling)was riding the Smokin Joes bike.Some exciting racing for sure.Marriage and not getting those channels for several years can snuff out a fledgling fire and thats what happened to me but I could probably get into it.
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline gl1dinorider

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #68 on: March 06, 2017, 06:52:16 pm »
i remember when i but a wee lad. . . . . . .

an old velocette sitting in an old corn crib. . . . .

the quilt thrown over it long rotted to dirt. . . . .

and the "old man" telling us kids to get the hell outa that barn!"

then laughing at s when we stood outside the corncrib gate and stared at the cool old motorcycle sitting there sinking into the dirt. . . .

thats been 40 someodd years ago. . . .

i guess i was maybe 6 or 8 years old. . .

looking back, i feel a little guilty about running my fingers through the decades of dirt and dust that had collected on the tank.

would love to know the story of that bike now.

this was probably way the hell out in the middle of nowhere on the backside of tazwell.

at least thats where my mind wants to put it.

we moved around a LOT when i was a kid. :-\

What does "riding season" mean?

Offline gl1dinorider

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #69 on: March 06, 2017, 06:53:16 pm »
and might i add,

i am really digging the history lessons happening here.

thank you sir  :21
What does "riding season" mean?

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #70 on: March 07, 2017, 04:47:29 pm »
and might i add,

i am really digging the history lessons happening here.

thank you sir  :21

You're welcome.   ;D
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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The Enthusiast Girl - Vivian Bales
« Reply #71 on: March 07, 2017, 06:59:46 pm »
VIVIAN BALES

Georgia’s moto-sweetheart Vivian Bales, “The Enthusiast Girl” captivated the American public during her long-distance solo motorcycle tours in the 1920’s and 30’s, a time when most women didn't drive cars. Arguably she was the first motorcycle cover girl appearing on the cover of the Harley house magazine The Enthusiast twice in 1929.  H-D's Arthur Davidson called her "The Georgia Peach" and helped publicize her trips to sell more Harleys.  Here she is drawing quite a crowd as she often did, decked out in her favorite riding gear on board her trusty 1929 Harley-Davidson model D. Twenty year old Bales was only 5’2” and weighed about 95 lbs and had taught herself to ride three years before.  She couldn’t kick start the bike herself but I would guess she wouldn’t have had any problems getting some guy to volunteer.  She later became a stunt rider and still later married and adopted three children.  Bates said that to her the motorcycle was a "key to the whole United States" which is an idea any modern touring rider could agree with.   She took her last ride in 1986 at the age of 77 and died in 2001.  Her funeral was marked by a procession of Harley-Davidsons.


To read more see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivian_Bales






« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 07:05:01 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Nickle Rocket - the GPz550
« Reply #72 on: March 08, 2017, 11:42:30 am »
Nickle Rocket - Kawasaki GPz550

In the early 80s Kawasaki took three of it standard range models, a 550cc, 750cc, and a 1100cc and gave them a more sports oriented treatment and a new name:  GPz.  The 1100 and 750 were impressive for their sheer power, the 1100 especially, but the real charmer was the 550cc.  It was outlandishly quick for its size and handled pretty well.  As a matter of fact, it was the complete package, good brakes, power, handling and relatively low weight for the time.  (slightly less than 60 hp and 480 pounds if memory serves) Magazine road testers raved about it and made a point that the little Kwacker had better quarter mile times than the original Z1.  The bike was a success throughout the mid 80s and only was left behind as the GSX-R revolution in sport bikes gradually made any bike with a steel frame and no racetrack pretensions obsolete. But, like many another bike overcome by new technology and styles, it remains a great ride.  As I see it, if a bike was ever a great ride it will always be worth riding.  The GPz550 qualifies.




1981 GPz550 (look closely in the 2nd photo and you’ll see the owner of this immaculate restoration pulled the carbs to adjust the jetting)





1982 GPz 550

« Last Edit: July 12, 2017, 06:22:09 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline MotoWacky

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #73 on: March 08, 2017, 03:57:48 pm »
This thread is very interesting.  Thanks for posting this stuff.

Offline SpareParts

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #74 on: March 08, 2017, 04:01:01 pm »
This thread is very interesting.  Thanks for posting this stuff.

Not much cruiser stuff, just vintage bikes.

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #75 on: March 09, 2017, 10:45:38 am »
I’ve been collecting motorcycle photos from the intertubes for a while now that I use as a screen saver on my computer.  Right now the collection has about 700 photos and the only common thread is that they involve something to do with motorcycling and it’s history and I like them.  I thought I’d start sharing the better ones and invite you folks to comment.  Let us know which ones you like and which ones you don’t.  Please feel free to comment if they bring back some memories for you too or share a great photo you may have found.  All participants welcome!
Note: emphasis added

SP, probably guilty as charged.  In my own defense I'm quoting the lead off paragraph to this thread which never said anything about representing all genre's of motorcycling equally.  These are just photos from my own collection.  Having said that, I do explore a lot of nooks and crannies of motorcycling lore because most of it interests me.

So, need more cruiser "stuff"?  Two options here and I like both of them.  1) Wait for me to get around to covering the bikes you want to see.   I probably will eventually.   or 2)  Post the pics and stories of the bikes you like yourself.  This thread has been open to others since it started and I promise, I won't mind at all if someone else wants to post here.
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #76 on: March 10, 2017, 05:45:29 am »
1984 Honda Nighthawk 700S


I've always been a fan of the mid-80s Honda Nighthawks, especially the Nighthawk 700S.  When this bike came out it was a complete surprise.  In a market increasingly populated by alternative engine designs such V-4's it was a conventional across the frame air-cooled four that incorporated some of the latest engineering touches such as self adjusting hydraulic valves and shaft drive.  It looked good, had good performance, and was ridiculously easy to maintain.  Thanks to the shaft drive, self adjusting valves and electronic ignition a major service and tune up consisted of changing the oil and spark plugs and washing it. 

The motorcycle press loved the bike.   The words of praise were immediate and universal. "Surprise: Custom now means California hot rod," announced Cycle. "The California hot rod: Honda’s fiddle-free speed shop special," said Rider. "An American-style, shaft-drive sport-custom that honors another American custom — hot rodding," gushed Cycle Guide. If the moto-scribes had it right, Honda had a real winner on it's hands. 

So why did the bike only last from 1984 to 1986?  The answer had almost nothing to do with whether the Nighthawk was a good bike or not.  The mid-80s saw a slump in motorcycle sales overall after years of steadily increasing sales.  In addition, the market was in a state of flux with new engine designs and styles being introduced.  Increasingly, bikes were aimed more closely at a specific role, Cruiser, Sportbike, or Tourer, so an all-arounder like the Nighthawk seemed old-fashioned and unable to match the performance in a certain job that a more specialized bike could offer.  So, despite being a very good and competent bike, the CB700S was cut from the line after only two years.  That was a shame.


Read more here:  http://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-japanese-motorcycles/honda-cb700sc-nighthawk-s












« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 06:57:06 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline PAULRIDES

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #77 on: March 10, 2017, 08:38:08 am »
Chris mentioned "Thought I would psot some collected pictures and see which ones folks liked".

LIKE 'EM ALL.  :21  Thanks for taking the time and effort.

 :happypep :happyrider
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #78 on: March 12, 2017, 02:02:01 pm »


John Surtees
1934-2017

A few years ago it became customary to talk of Valentino Rossi as the greatest motorcycle racer of all time, often shortened to GOAT. I’ve never thought much of this as 1) I don’t think you can compare racers across different eras and 2) There are other racers who have won more titles than Rossi. I still don’t think you can compare racers from different times, different machinery and different rules but I would point out there’s one racer who achieved something truly unique that sets him apart from even the greatest of his peers. That’s John Surtees who, having won 7 World Championships on motorcycles went looking for new worlds to conquer, took up auto racing and won the Formula 1 Grand Prix World Championship. The list of people who have won championships in the premier class on 2 wheels and 4 is very short...John Surtees. If there has to be a GOAT, then Surtees is the only logical candidate.

John Surtees died a couple of days ago at age 83. Even after a long and productive life his departure is a sad loss.


One of these two great riders may be the Greatest Of All Time

Here's an article from the British paper the Telegraph about the sad news:

From the Telegraph (UK): http://www.telegraph.co.uk/formula-1/2017/03/10/john-surtees-exceptional-polymath-petrol-blood/


********************************************************
John Surtees was an exceptional polymath
with petrol running through his veins


by Oliver Brown, chief sports feature writer
10 MARCH 2017 • 9:13PM

Il Grande Gianni, the Italians called him. Big John. Actually, John Surtees was a man of sparrow-like leanness all his life, but his feats behind a wheel belonged in the realm of the monumental. His distinction as the only driver ever to win world titles on two wheels as well as four, one likely to be retained long beyond his death yesterday at the age of 83, is one before which even the stars of Formula One melt in deference.

“It was great to meet you, legend,” wrote Mercedes driver Valtteri Bottas, pointing to a picture of the pair of them shaking hands on the podium at the 2014 British Grand Prix. Murray Walker, voice of the sport for over half a century and a fellow racer with Surtees when Brands Hatch was still a grass track in the 1940s, described his friend’s passing as an “absolute hammer blow”.

Try to imagine it today: a motorcyclist, a seven-time world champion admittedly, hopping into an F1 car and seizing the title four years later. It is motorsport’s equivalent of a concert pianist discovering that he can also play violin to the standard of Yehudi Menuhin. Of course, plenty of the skills are complementary, but Surtees, an incorrigible perfectionist, reached a consistency of excellence without equal.

Damon Hill, like Surtees, began his career on motorbikes but found his ambitions stymied when one reporter wrote that he “did not look destined for great things”. Valentino Rossi, such a maverick genius on a Yamaha, has long hinted at a reinvention in F1, but the transition has never come to pass. It is one thing to talk about such a daunting sea change, quite another to accomplish it. Surtees mastered it with alacrity.

Only the very few can convince Italian aficionados of their driving prowess, and Surtees, who treated his sleek MV Agusta with a subtlety that made it seem almost an extension of his body, was heralded as figlio del vento, the son of the wind.



The shock of this loss is magnified by the lucidity with which he was recalling his greatest glories just four weeks ago, on his 83rd birthday. Nothing animated him, it appeared, quite like romantic recollections of how he became smitten by his sport.

At the earliest juncture, there was petrol in his veins. His father, Jack, has made his name as a sidecar racer, and Surtees spent much of his childhood as the self-described “trainee mechanic”, even piecing together his first bike, a cherished old Wallis-Blackburne Speedway, when he was 11. Even while he was not allowed anywhere near a track, he would ride his creation on the cinder footpath that surrounded it.

His first race, Surtees would cheerfully admit, was not exactly a harbinger of greatness. It was a filthy wet day, and he found himself flung from his 500cc Excelsior “in every way you can imagine”. Surtees snr was perturbed, but not prepared to thwart the dream. “Lad, I think that it’s a bit big for you,” he advised.

Determined to channel his setbacks constructively, Surtees morphed into quite the prodigy. Having prevailed in his first championship race in 1954, he reeled off a stunning sequence of dominance in Italy, where he moved after being approached by Count Domenico Agusta at the team’s factory in Gallarate. The switch was not without its stresses. At one point, Surtees found himself inspected up and down by an elderly lady in a veil, who turned out to be Agusta’s mother. The count, breaking into a reassuring smile, informed him at last that he had been accepted into the family.

His talent was so self-evident that the Italian press wrote that Surtees did not need an Agusta to win. The verdict infuriated Agusta himself, who banned him from entering any races outside the world championship. However uneasy the rapprochement, their relationship worked: by 1960, Surtees had amassed seven titles in four years, with both 350 and 500cc engines.

The gravitation to F1 nearly did not happen at all. Lacking a television, he had never even watched a car race by the time the opportunity arose. But it was over dinner at a Sportsman of the Year function on Park Lane, where Mike Hawthorn, just anointed world champion with Ferrari, was at the same table. “John, try a car sometime,” Hawthorn suggested, mischievously. “They stand up easier.”

Making his debut for Lotus in Monaco in 1960, in what was also his first visit to the principality, he had an instant impact. Runner-up at the British Grand Prix, just his second race, he ought to have won at his next outing in Estoril, where he led by 26 seconds before an unfortunate clip with some straw bales on the back straight.

Ultimately, his gifts would be brought to the fruition they deserved.

Surtees claimed the 1964 title in an extraordinary denouement in Mexico City, where the chances of rival Graham Hill were derailed by a collision with Lorenzo Bandini. He could have won a second with Ferrari in 1966, had he not been embroiled in an ugly falling out with team manager Eugenio Dragoni, which prompted Surtees to quit the sport on the spot.

His last years were disfigured by tragedy, after the death of his son, Henry, in a Formula Two race in 2009. And yet even amid unspeakable pain, he turned his grief to some good, establishing the Henry Surtees Foundation to help those recovering from brain injuries. The continued success of that charity would represent the richest tribute to motorsport’s most extraordinary polymath.


******************* end of article **************************

Additional photos of an amazing career:




Surtees and his MV Agusta-Isle of Man at Creg-ny-Ba corner - late 50’s


Focused on the apex - Surtees and Ferrari at Monaco 1963

After retiring from active racing John became a race team owner and then race car constructor.  After retiring from that he became very active in the vintage car and bike worlds in the UK and attended a lot of events, often bringing machinery from his own collection.


At a vintage bike event with a Vincent


Demonstrating a Ferrari F1 car.


On one of his MV Agusta race bikes at the Goodwood Festival 2010


Awarded the CBE (Commander in the Order of the British Empire) which made him Sir John Surtees last year.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 07:31:03 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #79 on: March 12, 2017, 03:59:50 pm »
My F1 fan time was cut short by the same changes that stopped my Bike racing watching back in the 90s.I remember even back then alot of talk and respect for him but I never knew why.Now I know and understand.What a talented man he was.
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #80 on: March 13, 2017, 04:21:31 am »
Hang in there.   Winter is almost over.


1929 Harley Davidson JDH Classic 2 Cam Motorcycle
« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 07:36:07 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline gl1dinorider

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #81 on: March 13, 2017, 12:45:21 pm »
1984 Honda Nighthawk 700S



to this day io still think they are an awesome looking and riding machine

always loved these bikes.

had the 450, midnight blue with the chrome slash stripe.

« Last Edit: July 12, 2017, 06:24:07 pm by Chris »
What does "riding season" mean?

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #82 on: March 13, 2017, 10:38:56 pm »
My F1 fan time was cut short by the same changes that stopped my Bike racing watching back in the 90s.I remember even back then alot of talk and respect for him but I never knew why.Now I know and understand.What a talented man he was.

A couple of good British TV shows on Youtube about John Surtees.  I think the second one is more fun.


Legends of Formula 1: John Surtees



Racing Legends: John Surtees

« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 10:55:27 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #83 on: March 13, 2017, 10:48:06 pm »
always loved these bikes.

had the 450, midnight blue with the chrome slash stripe.

to this day io still think they are an awesome looking and riding machine

Rick,

I like the CB450SC too and got some seat time on a friend's in the early 90s.  I thought it was possibly the ultimate commuter/around the town bike.  I also love that engine.  Not a lot of power but that may be the most reliable bike motor Honda ever made, and that's saying something!

Here's a link to a Nighthawk website, particularly the 450 Nighthawk page:  http://paulsnighthawkpages.blogspot.com/p/nh-450.html

Here's some photos so folks know what we're talking about:

1982 Honda 450 Nighthawk  (CB450SC)





« Last Edit: July 12, 2017, 06:49:03 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #84 on: March 15, 2017, 04:10:50 pm »
Here's a bike I know we have a few fans of.  (Are you there Skeeter?)

The original 1969 Kawasaki 500cc Mach III triple in all it's drum braked glory.  (And an illustration from Japan's RideX magazine to prove they haven't forgotten them in the old country.)



« Last Edit: July 12, 2017, 06:58:17 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #85 on: March 15, 2017, 08:30:23 pm »
 :21
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #86 on: March 17, 2017, 11:20:05 pm »
Roy Rogers
Motorcyclist





If you were born after 1970 or so the name Roy Rogers probably doesn’t mean much to you.  But if you were growing up in the 1950s there wasn’t a bigger star in Hollywood for kids.  Roy was “King of the Cowboys” and he and his wife Dale Evans, along with his horse Trigger, and dog Bullet had a hugely popular TV show.  Roy had quite a bit of early success as a Western singer before taking to the movies as a “singing cowboy” like Gene Autry.  His movie career was successful and prolific with Rogers making more than 100 films before being one of the first stars to venture into the new medium of television. In the Motion Picture Herald Top Ten Money-Making Western Stars poll, Rogers was listed for 16 consecutive years, from 1939 to 1954, holding first place from 1943 to 1954. His popularity included his name and image ending up on everything from comic books to kids clothes and toys.  He even had a fast food restaurant chain named after him.  He very publicly stood four square for God and country and consciously acted as a role model for the “little buckaroos” who watched his show religiously.  An all around good guy, he and his wife were very active in a wide range of charities, especially those benefiting children.  But Roy had a side of his life that wouldn’t have met with wide approval for kiddies.

The truth is that Roy Rogers loved motorcycles and fast cars.  Yup, the King of the Cowboys often left Trigger in the barn and hopped on a succession of Indians, Harleys, and later Hondas to roar into action or just make it home after a hard day at the Republic back lot churning out westerns.  He was one of us! 

By the time Roy died in 1998 his movies were out of fashion, his music was archaic, and the man and his wife seemed impossibly corny.  But, what if he really was the guy he pretended to be on the silver screen?  From what I can see, he really did try to be that square shooter cowboy hero in real life.  Deeply religious, he lived his faith with the love of his life Dale at his side, adopting and raising several kids and always ready with a helping hand to a deserving individual or charity.  Compared to what passes for celebrity these days, maybe corny ain’t so bad.

Happy Trails Roy, until we meet again...



Look!  Cowboys and Indians! 
On the cover of the Indian factory magazine Trigger looks on disapprovingly as Roy rides his Indian. 


Roy and daughters on his Indian




Roy on the Cover of Harley Davidson’s Enthusiast magazine


Roy made the switch to Honda in the ‘60s.


Roy and his 1982 Honda









Roy Rogers kids clothes


Roy Rogers comics


Here’s Roy and Dale helping the Eisenhower family celebrate Ike’s grandson's birthday.



Here's a short video on Youtube by his son about Roy's motorcycles:
CHRIS
________________________

CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #87 on: March 21, 2017, 10:59:45 pm »
I've written about Tritons before (4 Dec 2015) but ran across some great photos that I wanted to share so I thought I'd republish the original text and photo and add the new photos.  This new info on Tritons will also let me lead into a specialty motorcycle Ian and I have been talking about building someday.

Hope you enjoy it.


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Triton



Harking back to the days of mods and rockers, "doing the ton" and jet helmets, here's one of Albion's finest innovations...the Triton!  Born in England in the '60's, the Triton was a home made cafe racer mash up of two of the best selling Brit bikes of the era,Nortons and Triumphs.  The logic behind it was simple.  The Norton bikes using the Featherbed frame and Roadholder forks handled better than any other Brit bike but the motors went bust if you hot rodded them.  The Triumph engine was common and robust,  but the handling of Triumphs was much like a bicycle with an engine.  The fix was both obvious and actually pretty easy.  Cut some new engine mounting plates out of aluminum and stick the Trumpet running gear into the Norton frame.  Shazam!  The Triton (Triumph-Norton) was born!  Pretty soon, it seemed every garden shed in the UK was cranking out these home built specials and it became the iconic cafe racer of the era.  Lots of specialist firms started making items to help, such as petrol tanks and seats like the ones you see here. A well built Triton actually works pretty good, living up to the promise of decent handling and better power than most factory bikes of the time, like Sportsters and Bonnevilles. People still make them and it's certainly an instant classic when another one hits the road.  One very cool thing about Tritons is that literally no two of them are the same since each reflects the choices and skills of the bloke who made them.

The one pictured has some nice details like the Norton Commando TLS front brake and the magneto ignition for the engine.  It also has a couple things that make me wondering what the fella was thinking when he made it like the cable looped over the headlight shell.  But that's a Triton for you, always a good source for discussion in the pub over a pint as you and your mates argue about what better choices could have been made and praising the parts that came out well.

Oh, and as an additional bit of trivia, did you know the term "cafe racer" was originally an insult?  The term was applied to the bikes that showed up at the coffee houses (cafes) that bikers congregated at in the UK and originally meant that they were only pretend racers, built only to look fast and not proper racers at all.  Think of the modern American term "squid" and you'll have the feel of it.   



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additional photos













Not the same bike but a couple of shots to show how no two Tritons ever come out quite the same.







« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 11:11:18 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
________________________

CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline skeeter

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #88 on: March 21, 2017, 11:37:49 pm »
cafe racer , put a song on the juke box .run your bike across a bridge & back before the song was over ,had to run at least the ton to do it, some where in england .well that's what i heard . 8)
if you are gonna go,go old school.

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos
« Reply #89 on: March 22, 2017, 03:34:21 pm »
cafe racer , put a song on the juke box .run your bike across a bridge & back before the song was over ,had to run at least the ton to do it, some where in england .well that's what i heard . 8)
Skeeter,

I heard that story too in a couple of variations when I was living in England.  One variation was the racer had to make it round a certain roundabout and back before the song ended or, as you say, to a certain bridge.  Another variation was which cafe this was all happening at with the famous Ace Cafe on London's North Circular being the usual place used in the story.  One guy even mentioned a certain song on the jukebox that was used for the timing.  I suspect that, for most of the stories, just like in America,  as the years go by the bikes and the riders in the tales get faster and faster in the telling.
CHRIS
________________________

CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT