Author Topic: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History  (Read 6600 times)

Offline PAULRIDES

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #150 on: July 05, 2017, 07:00:14 am »
I need enlightening as to why one uses some other media to put pictures in attachments? 

Mine just come directly out of my computer file (I do downsize pictures using FOTOSIZER.

If not downsized, I think they would be too big for the screen and would limit how many in one post. 
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #151 on: July 05, 2017, 12:21:15 pm »
The chief advantage to using a photo sharing site vs. the way you're doing it is the ease of sharing the photo to multiple sites.  For example, if you wanted to post your ride reports to two or three forums you'd need to load the photos individually to each forum you wanted to post on.  By using a photo sharing site, if I want to post the same stuff to another forum it's a copy and paste job to share it as the photos are loaded on one central website that can be viewed from many different places.
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Offline PAULRIDES

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #152 on: July 05, 2017, 04:31:58 pm »
Thanks Chris. Guess I would have to try it to know.

I use to post on Country Roads as well and it was individual pictures again, except could do them all at one time (total file transfer). Anyway, after a falling out with Dan, I am not involved with Country Roads. 

Never road with them much anyway, not my kind of ride (Larger groups, Main roads mostly, Ride to Eat, etc.). That said, I did enjoy some of the activities and a few rides. We used our house for a couple get togethers sponsored by Country Roads.

Anyway, that is history - I Mostly Just Ride.  :happypep :happyrider and folks are welcome to tag along if they also ride.  :)
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)

Offline Chris

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We now resume our regularly scheduled service...
« Reply #153 on: July 05, 2017, 10:03:13 pm »


A lot of people forget now that originally Honda's mid-1970s Goldwings were big naked standard bikes.  What difference from the highly specialized Wings of today!

Which would you rather have...naked or fully dressed?

CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #154 on: July 06, 2017, 05:52:49 am »
That's easy.Both.The F6B is the closest to the original in current form having no cruise control, or even a trunk.With it having a flat 6 and the gas tank under the seat the weight is kept low so they are not top heavy.Makes for a nice handling bike with comfort.Of course the trunk and other goodies doesn't make the regular wing a pig either.I wouldn't mind having an old wing or two to play around with.Sometimes old and simple are just more fun.
Marc

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Offline IanC

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #155 on: July 06, 2017, 12:10:15 pm »
Old without a doubt.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #156 on: July 06, 2017, 08:55:33 pm »
I'm thinking an old naked wing would be pretty cool. 
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #157 on: July 07, 2017, 05:23:20 am »
Yup
Marc

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Offline Chris

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RD--"Race Developed"--and they meant it!
« Reply #158 on: July 07, 2017, 08:48:28 pm »
Old School Speed Saturday

The Yamaha RD series of bikes


Cycle magazine cover November 1977

For about a decade from the late '60s to the end of the 70's there was a surge of two stroke street bikes from Japan.  These bikes had a deserved reputation as "giant killers" with the two stroke advantage of high specific power output for their displacement giving them a straight line speed and acceleration advantage and light weight helping them on a curvy road.  Two of the Japanese "Big Four" factories, Suzuki and Kawasaki, developed larger two stroke bikes such Suzuki's  GT750 "Water Buffalo" tourer and Kawasaki's H2 750cc triple. 



Yamaha RD350

But Yamaha may have made the best of all the two stroke sport bikes with the wonderful RD series of small bore bikes.  The line started with the RD350 in 1973 when the existing R5 350cc parallel twin gained reed valves instead of port timing induction.  The Yamaha was a marvel, with high power at 39 hp, light weight at about 325 lbs, and the best brakes in the class with a single disc up front and a drum at the back.  The fact that it all was bolted to a frame that was a virtual twin to the one from the Yamaha TZ350 racer didn't hurt either.  On a curvy country road the Yamaha could, and usually did, show up a CB750 Honda or Z1 Kawasaki.



Cycle World magazine cover March 1976



Yamaha RD400C

The bikes got better in '76 with the introduction of the RD400C with more power at 44 bhp, better brakes with a disc front and rear, and the first factory cast wheels.  It would do the quarter in 14.01, not a bad time at all for the era.  They were also easy to modify and it wasn't unheard of for a tuned RD400 to put out close to 60 hp although at those power levels you could expect to have a power band like a light switch with two settings, on and off. As with the earlier RDs, race track evolution with the TZ series of race bikes continued to be mirrored by the street bikes.


Yamaha RD350LC

As good as the bikes were, the end was coming in the US.  Tighter emission standards gradually eliminated two stroke street bikes on American roads and the RD400's successor, the RD350LC, wasn't imported into the US.  I owned an "Elsie" in the UK in the early 80s and it was just a wonderful bike, light and fun and fast.  There was one last brief swan song in the US with the RZ350 YPVS equipped with catalytic converters but they didn't sell very many of them before emission concerns killed them and now they are much sought after collectors bikes. 

Yamaha RZ350 YPVS

It's too bad really, that all the great little two strokes are gone.  They were special, offering true race track performance at a bargain price.  Equally special was the thrill they offered of absolutely thrashing any bike up to twice their displacement and twice the price on a country road.  I miss the little rascals.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 08:51:00 pm by Chris »
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline PAULRIDES

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #159 on: July 08, 2017, 07:30:17 am »
Apparently, you got it all back as it was.  ;D 
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #160 on: July 08, 2017, 09:12:55 am »
Apparently, you got it all back as it was.  ;D

Nope, not even close yet but I've managed to put about 100 photos back up.
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Deuce

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #161 on: July 08, 2017, 09:05:13 pm »
 :21
2006 VTX1300C 205/70/15 Hydroedge rear tire, Leatherlyke Bags, Batwing, Cobra floor boards, Vance & Hines pipes, LEDGlow, Pair Mod, Kuryakin Hypercharger Pro, Mustang seat, Cobra passing lights, Cobra Case Gaurds, 3" Fork extensions, 1800C Shocks, Cobra Tach, Custom Risers, Custom Kickstand, and a  WOLO Badboy Horn.

Offline Chris

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V-Max
« Reply #162 on: July 11, 2017, 01:04:31 pm »
Yamaha V-max
Yamaha V-max

Sometimes, a bike comes along that doesn't fit in any of motorcycling's pigeon holes and no familiar categorization quite suits it.  Yamaha's V-max was certainly that in 1985 when it was unleashed on an unsuspecting world.  First off was the almost cartoonish cruiser styling with large fake air scoops on each side and the biggest rear tyre in motorcycling.  Then there was the huge and heavy engine lump that Yamaha said made 145 hp!  Then there was the straight line performance which was incredible by mid-80s standards.  So what was that thing?  A cruiser? The styling said yes but not with 145 horses to play with.  A tourer? Shaft drive and smooth V-4 engine suggested it might be but the lack of bags and the seat said it was a day cruiser.  A sport bike?  Engine performance said it could be but the weight and soft suspension said corner carving wasn't in the bike's resume. People started calling it a "muscle" or "power" cruiser but really, the darn thing was in a class of one, unique, and so we usually just said "V-max" and didn't try to compare it to anything else exactly.


Cycle Canada March 1985



The fake scoops were outrageous but almost nobody made fun of them.  The reason the bike got a pass on those things is that it's performance lived up to the pose.  In a straight line, the bike really could walk away from almost anything else that was street legal.  As dyed in the wool sport bike guys we made fun of its lack of handling and the goofy styling that was so different from the Gixxers and FZ750s we loved but nobody ever doubted the V-max's ability to be the first bike to the other side of the intersection when the light changed.   The secret was simple.  Big torque rich motor pumping out lots of horses stuck in a long wheelbase chassis pretty much optimized for manageable straight line acceleration.  Yamaha was pretty optimistic about the 145hp at the crank but dyno tests confirmed you were getting an honest 110-115 hp to the ground and the high horsepower numbers weren't even the really good news.  That was the river of torque the motor churned out which peaked at 6600 RPM with 83.1 ft-lbs at the rear wheel but was more than plenty at any RPM.  Those dyno numbers would still be pretty good now and are slightly better than what the current Honda ST1300 and Yamaha FJ1300 bikes are putting out, bikes that are 20 years newer and slightly larger displacement.  In 1985 those numbers were other worldly, the stuff of science fiction.   Plainly the Yamaha tuning fork guys did a hell of a job with the V-max's engine.  One way they got more from less was the V-boost system the V-max used.  It was a way of plumbing the intake tract with butterfly valves so that above 5000 RPM each cylinder sucked from two carbs instead of one somewhat like an automotive four barrel carb using the extra bores above a certain point.  Supposedly it was good for an extra 10 hp and boosted torque.  Whatever the engineering black magic was that they came up with, it worked.  A stock V-max would cover the quarter mile in 10.88 @ 125mph and had a top speed of 146mph, which would have been a lot higher except the unfaired Mr. Max was about as aerodynamic as a hurled brick with its rider fluttering in the slipstream like a leather clad drag chute. 



Motorcyclist March 1985

Yamaha V-max in flight

So what was it like to ride?  I got some seat time with one and it was...ummm...different.  First off, the bike was all about the engine which besides being a powerhouse also sounded pretty darn nice, in a V-8 hot rod sort of way.  With all that torque on tap you were never more than a twist of the wrist away from some pretty sudden acceleration and the sit up and beg riding position meant you felt all of it trying to loosen your grip on the bars.  It made you glad the seat had a nice step to it to keep you from sliding off the back.  The handling wasn't all that bad and ground clearance was surprisingly generous.  The combination of plenty of torque and long wheelbase stability made long sweepers pretty fun.  A tight twisting road was a different matter and the combination of soft suspension and the Max's 630 pound weight would make you think you had taken up bull wrestling as a hobby.  But, none of that mattered.  What the bike was really built for and what it was just about perfect for was urban cruising and being the first guy away from the light at any intersection while making All American Saturday night at the drag strip noises.  Riding it like that was just huge fun and pretty addictive.  I ended up liking the Max way more than the spec sheet suggested I would.


Cycle World August  1988

Would a V-max make a good bike now?  Yep, it sure would.  It virtues, vices and essential character are still as unique as when it freaked us all out in 1985.  Since it stayed largely the same over a very long production run there's a lot of support for the old dog both in knowledgeable support groups and parts  There's even quite a large body of knowledge about how to make one with a lot more horse power should you think Mr. Max needs that.  The bike has also been a popular platform for customization, particularly in France where some of the most outrageous custom Maxes came from.  I've even seen magazine articles about lightweight, single sided swingarm, chain drive, cafe racer Maxes on nitrous!  Personally, I'd keep one mostly stock, enjoy the peace of mind reliability gives you and probably fit an aftermarket pipe mostly to enjoy the great sound track.  Trust me, it's not like the bike is a wimp in stock form.
   
The original V-max stuck around for more than 20 years in pretty much the original 1985 form.  It was subject to numerous small mods to the engine and suspension over the years all of which helped make it a better ride but Yamaha stayed pretty close to the original wildly outrageous concept.  It worked because, as I said at the start, the V-max really was in a class all by itself and didn't have to worry about much competition.  For the guys who wanted a V-max, no other bike fit the bill.
CHRIS
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Offline Deuce

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #163 on: July 11, 2017, 08:56:46 pm »
Always loved the vmax.
2006 VTX1300C 205/70/15 Hydroedge rear tire, Leatherlyke Bags, Batwing, Cobra floor boards, Vance & Hines pipes, LEDGlow, Pair Mod, Kuryakin Hypercharger Pro, Mustang seat, Cobra passing lights, Cobra Case Gaurds, 3" Fork extensions, 1800C Shocks, Cobra Tach, Custom Risers, Custom Kickstand, and a  WOLO Badboy Horn.

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #164 on: August 01, 2017, 10:57:43 pm »
Kawasaki Z-1



Kawasaki Z-1

Most folks will tell you that the 1969 Honda 750 Four, introduced at the Tokyo Show in 1968, is the first Japanese Superbike and the founder of modern motorcycling.


I agree.  Well...sort of. 

The truth is that the Honda 750 was a great bike, reliable and full of cool new technology like disc brakes, overhead cams, and lots of cylinders, but not a particularly sporty one.  It's styling was more old 60s Brit bike than 70s Japanese and it was actually more of a tourer than a sportbike.  Hardcore performance riders were left looking more at the BSA Rocket Three which did look the part and managed to score some racing successes.  The problem was simply that everyone knew the Big Brit bike would go bust sooner rather than later so lusting after one in the dealers showroom was a lot better than writing a check and actually owning one. So, which way to go....reliable but a little boring or exciting and likely to keep you busy in the garage?

Then the Kawasaki Z-1 showed up in 1972.



Cycle Guide Sept '73

Wow.  It had it all, stunning performance and great looks and there wasn't much that could keep up with one. The performance numbers, 130 mph top speed and mid-12's in the quarter mile were smokin' hot in 1972 and faster than any other production bike.   Even better, it was stone ax reliable and would cruise at just about any speed up to that 125-130 mph max as long as there was gas in the tank. 

And the story of how it came to be was a good one.  Kawasaki started development of their new four cylinder wonder bike in 1967 and by October of 1968 the bike, a 750cc, was running and just about ready for production. The '68 Tokyo Show came along and Honda introduced the CB750.  That stopped the Kawasaki effort in its tracks.  They couldn't introduce their own 750cc four now, it would just look like they were copying Honda instead of dropping the bombshell they had planned for.  It was, quite literally, time to go back to the drawing board.

The new project was high priority for Kawasaki and the bike was known inside the factory as the T103.  First and foremost, their newly reinvented four cylinder bike would have to beat Honda in every respect.  They drafted the best motorcycle engineers they had and assigned them to the project.  A lot of market research was done to ensure they were making the bike hardcore motorcyclists wanted and to identify what the perceived deficiencies of the Honda design were. To beat the CB750 their new focus was on bigger displacement, hiked to 903cc,  dual overhead cams instead of the Honda's single cam, and more power...a LOT more power.  So, the new T103 became much more of what the Honda wasn't, a true performance bike to appeal to the sport  riders of the day.  It also was restyled to look more modern and sporty than the Honda.  Once it was ready in 1971 the factory sent it to the US for a brutal testing program that quite simply tried very hard to make the new bike break, The bike, now known by the code word "New York Steak", was run flat out for hours at Talladega speedway. It was driven 8000 miles from Daytona to  California and back disguised as a Honda CB750.  They discovered the new bike had some handling quirks and ate tyres and chains like m&m's but the motor just shrugged it all off.  Much of those problems weren't truly the fault of the Z-1's design.  In 1971 there simply weren't tyres and chains that could live up to a 542 lb bike putting out 81hp. (I remember in 1977 going through new premium rear tyres on my BMW R100RS every 2500-3000 miles. A front would last about 5000.) At the conclusion of the tests the bike was judged ready for production.  The initial production rate was set at 1500 bikes per month.




The best part of the whole bike! 

It wasn't enough to keep up with demand.  The new Z-1 sold like crazy, about 85,000 bikes in the three years of production before being replaced by it's evolutionary offspring, the KZ900. Over the following years a succession of KZ's like the KZ1000 followed and all were recognizably the descendants of the original Z-1.  Even today I'd say there is still some Z-1 DNA in the current z1000.

My personal experience with the big Zee consists of two days riding a borrowed bike in Germany in 1978.  A friend was thinking hard about buying a Beemer like mine so we arranged to go riding one weekend with him riding my bike and me on his Zee.  My impressions of his bike were much like what everyone has written about the bike.  Really strong motor, amazing acceleration, crap brakes even with two discs up front, and occasionally scary handling.  I vividly remember following him through a small cobblestone German village and him gassing the R100RS leaving the town, "Aha", I thought, "now I'll reel him in." and nailed the gas.  The Zee spun the rear tyre on the cobblestones and got a little sideways.  I corrected on the bars and rolled off the gas.  Mistake.  The bike got into a tankslapper and the bars whipped back and forth to the stops so hard the mirrors came unscrewed and started twirling in their mounts.  The bike came back as it continued to slow and I rolled back on the gas slowly while laughing out loud.   I'll never forget the Zee and those mirrors spinning in their mounting holes. If ever there was a bike that needed a steering damper it was the Z-1.



"New York Steak"

The Z-1 was the first of a new breed of high horsepower bikes the word "Superbike" was coined to describe and the first bike from Japan to absolutely rule the performance roost.  It took the fastest production motorcycle title away from the long time holder, the Vincent Black Shadow.  It was one of the founding members of the UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle) club since it worked so well that soon every Japanese factory was cranking out across the frame four cylinder bikes in every displacement class.  The layout has become the commonest one for fast sporting bikes.  Now even BMW does four across the frame bikes which would have be unthinkable when the Z-1 came out.

Even today a good Z-1 is a fun and practical bike to ride.  They are no longer are the performance icon they were in the early 70s but  a properly maintained Z is still has that anvil-like engine reliability and it will surely draw a crowd.  And now, with better tyres and shocks and perhaps by replacing the swingarm bearings and installing the swinger from a Suzuki GS1100 the old Kwacker will handle much better than it ever did when new.  But, be prepared, a good Z-1 can run about $15,000 (or more) these days since most of them have been exported out of the country.  Who would ever have guessed that back in the day?
« Last Edit: August 01, 2017, 11:05:29 pm by Chris »
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline PAULRIDES

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #165 on: August 04, 2017, 04:47:01 pm »
I am partial to Yamaha after the picture of one at the International MC Show that you posted.
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #166 on: August 05, 2017, 11:36:23 am »
Yamaha XS650


The Yamaha XS650 model was made in various styles from 1969 to 1985 and so was one of the longer lived models in Yamaha's history.  It's engine design had its first iteration as a German design from the mid 50's which was developed by a few Japanese firms (including Showa) and was inherited by Yamaha when the tuning fork firm bought out those companies.  At first, Yamaha didn't do anything with the design concentrating instead on their line of two stroke motorcycles.  Then in the late 60's they decided they needed a four stroke bike and so plugged the OHC four stroke twin into a fairly light two stroke style frame and introduced it as the XS1 in 1969.  The engine was a good one but not perfect.   Yes, it had an overhead cam and made fair power and good torque.  It also had horizontally split cases so that it didn't leak oil, unlike the British twins.  But, it didn't have anything to control the vibrations of a big twin like counter balancer shafts and so it had two spots in the rev range where it would give the rider a good dose of vibes.  Of course, in 1969 people thought that motorcycles were supposed to vibrate and so at that time it wasn't seen as a great defect.  Also, with the fairy heavy lump of an engine living in a light weight (and flexible) frame the bike didn't handle all that well and developed a reputation for wallowing in the turns.  The bike sold fairly well although being introduced in the same year as the Honda CB750 meant it was pretty much overshadowed by the Honda offering.  Sales were good enough to keep it in production year after year and gradually the bike was modified to eliminate many of the faults.  Over the years they replaced the frame with a heavier and stronger one, replaced the front drum brake with a disc and later upgraded that set up to twin discs up front and another disc in the rear.  So later bikes are much better.  The engine remained pretty much the same throughout the run with its virtues, reliability and good torque, and vices, modest power and vibration, always remaining.









Bottom line?  A pretty good bike and fun to ride but make sure you get one of the later ones.  These are much used as bases for making cafe racers and street trackers.  There are lots of parts still out there and they were reliable to start with so it's an oldie that is still relevant as a daily driver in the modern world.  I'd love to have one in my garage.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2017, 11:40:37 am by Chris »
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #167 on: August 08, 2017, 10:37:26 am »
This is kind of fun.  I found this photo on the internet and the story is that the fella shown is a Native American and motorcycle enthusiast.  His choice of rides?

Indian of course!



I have my doubts about his stylish riding gear though.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2017, 10:38:58 am by Chris »
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #168 on: August 13, 2017, 04:16:58 pm »
CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline IanC

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #169 on: August 14, 2017, 06:07:25 pm »
Cool chart.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #170 on: August 17, 2017, 12:33:59 pm »


The Suzuki 2017 MotoGP team
Andrea Iannone   -    Alex Rins






CHRIS
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1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline IanC

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #171 on: August 18, 2017, 12:23:44 am »
Hoping for something a bit more competitive next season.
1978 Suzuki GS1000EC - Completely custom.
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #172 on: August 26, 2017, 10:44:15 am »
I found this 1975 Honda ad on the Pinterest photosharing site.  The mid 70s were a good time to be a motorcyclist!  Which one would you want?



CHRIS
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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2006 Yamaha Star Roadliner
« Reply #173 on: October 11, 2017, 06:02:41 am »


In 2006 Cycle World magazine's annual 10 Best Motorcycles named the Yamaha Star Roadliner as the best cruiser.  Then in 2011 they picked it again as one of the 10 best used bikes.  I'm not a cruiser guy but even I thought the bike looked wonderful and a quick glance at the spec sheet suggested it would work pretty well too.  Here's the write up the guys in Cycle World posted:




Every manufacturer hopes to hit a home run with a new model, but with the Star Roadliner, Yamaha has belted a game-winning grand slam. Beneath this bike’s wall-to-wall art-deco styling is a big-inch cruiser that performs better than its competition in virtually every way. Its 1854cc, counter­balanced, 48-degree engine is a torque-rich powerhouse that belts out the soulful sound and visceral feel that can only emanate from a narrow-angle V-Twin. It’s a big motorcycle, but thanks to its stiff aluminum chassis, low cg, high-quality suspension and intelligent mass centralization, the ’Liner feels and handles much smaller. It has excellent cornering manners, superb straight-line stability, easy maneuverability and a truly pleasant ride. Touch ’em all! - Cycle World - 2006


I checked out what they seem to be going for these days and the average seems to be around $5000.  As an matter of fact there's a nice one with less than 15K miles in great shape for sale on the Nashville craigslist for $4895 right now. That's a whole lot of motorcycle for less than five kilobucks!
« Last Edit: October 11, 2017, 06:13:22 am by Chris »
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CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #174 on: October 11, 2017, 03:36:33 pm »
I always drooled over those but money and my small size stopped that.You shoulda seen the sweet triked one I saw sell for around 13k a few months back.Sweet rides for sure.
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Offline Deuce

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #175 on: October 11, 2017, 06:30:31 pm »
They are nice bikes without a doubt.
2006 VTX1300C 205/70/15 Hydroedge rear tire, Leatherlyke Bags, Batwing, Cobra floor boards, Vance & Hines pipes, LEDGlow, Pair Mod, Kuryakin Hypercharger Pro, Mustang seat, Cobra passing lights, Cobra Case Gaurds, 3" Fork extensions, 1800C Shocks, Cobra Tach, Custom Risers, Custom Kickstand, and a  WOLO Badboy Horn.

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #176 on: October 11, 2017, 07:41:39 pm »
My intermittent and very occasional motorcycle musical award goes to the country band Gloriana for their video and song "How Far Do You Wanna Go" from 2009 or so.  I can't help it.  A country rock video starring an old BMW bike, a late 60's Mustang, AND a hot blonde?  I'm there!  After all, I love old Beemers and I've still got the hot blonde!  (41 years and counting....)

Here's the video:



« Last Edit: October 11, 2017, 07:45:12 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
________________________

CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #177 on: October 14, 2017, 08:00:50 pm »
Ian  and I got to meet Wes Cooley, one of the original AMA Superbike Champions, at the Barber Vintage Festival recently and I wrote about that in my ride report. 

Here's some photos of Wes back in the day doing great things with his Yoshimura Suzuki GS1000 Superbike.  A great racer and good guy to boot, he won the Superbike Championship two years running in '79 and '80.





And here he is standing with my "Wes Cooley replica".
« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 08:02:29 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
________________________

CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Chris

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #178 on: October 14, 2017, 08:06:15 pm »
Anybody besides me remember that a woman and a bike was featured on the original Batman TV show?



Yep that's Yvonne Craig and the Batgirl bike.  Supposedly, somewhere under all that fluff is a Yamaha YDS-5E that would have originally looked something like this:

« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 08:15:44 pm by Chris »
CHRIS
________________________

CURRENT BIKES

1978 GS1000C / 1979 GS1000S / 1981 CM400C / 1986 RG500 GAMMA / 1988 R100RS / 1991 K100RS / 1997 GSF1200 BANDIT

Offline Luvmystar

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Re: Internet Motorcycle Photos & History
« Reply #179 on: October 15, 2017, 05:52:50 am »
I remember that bike from the show.And her.A hot girl on a bike.
Marc

Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.