Author Topic: More Events (MemorialDayWeekend) & June two weeks (Dollywood and Splash Country)  (Read 613 times)

Offline PAULRIDES

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SAT and SUN --- Heard on WBIR the historic mansions (2 of them) in Knoxville are giving FREE Tours 10AM til 3PM. Supposedly can get details on their web site. I have not as of yet, but would like to go SAT AM. I have toured Blount Mansion, but not the other one (forget the name of the other one). If interested, let me know or look up the INFO and go yourself.
 
June 3 - 9 SPLASH COUNTRY $5 to Food Ministry.
June 10 - 16 DOLLYWOOD same donation of $5 for Food Ministry.
Residents (37736, 37764,37862,37863,37864,37865,37868,37876 or those employed in Sevier County.
Lot of rules and regulations regarding children (3 and under do not need ticket, 16 and older need must have state or federal PHOT ID, 13 - 15 yr old must have state or federal ID and be accompanied by someone 16 yr or older, etc. etc. - (it's too complicated for me to retype it all - call them 865 428 9498)
 
Sunday --- Memorial Thunder Ride from Court House in Sevierville to Veterans Overlook - same as last year, I guess. I don't do those rides, sometimes go to watch the morning activity or ride to Veterans Overlook by myself.
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)

Offline PAULRIDES

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Found INFO -- Fort and Mansions Tour. MAY 27  10AM to 3PM

http://www.knoxalliance.com/historic-homes-of-knoxville-celebrate-statehood-day-on-may-21-may-27-may-28-and-june-3/

I am interested in Maybry-Hazen House (1711 Dandridge Ave)  as have seen the Fort and Blount Mansion (By The Way -- those are worth seeing). I am going AM early whether Betty goes or not. She is always a question. GROAN

Copied some INFO from Web Site:
Built in 1858 and housing three generations of the same family from 1858-1987, the Mabry-Hazen House served as headquarters for both Union and Confederate forces during the Civil War. The Civil War, a gunfight on Gay Street in 1882, and a Breach of Promise lawsuit in the early 1930ís are only a few stories that bring life and color to a visit to the museum. Hosting free admission with living historians. Donations are appreciated. Address: 1711 Dandridge Avenue, Knoxville, TN, 37915. Information: 865-522-8661, www.mabryhazen.com

The Mabry-Hazen House Museum , listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is located atop Mabry's Hill in Knoxville, Tennessee. Built in 1858 and housing three generations of the same family from 1858-1987, the Mabry-Hazen House served as headquarters for both Union and Confederate forces during the Civil War. This stately, elegant home of the Victorian and Civil War periods showcases one of the largest original family collection in America. Containing original artifacts including china, silver, crystal, and antique furnishings, this home is a rare view into the past. The Civil War, a gunfight on Gay Street in 1882, and a Breach of Promise lawsuit in the early 1930's are only a few stories that bring life and color to those who visit the museum.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2017, 08:25:45 pm by PAULRIDES »
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)

Offline PAULRIDES

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The Mabry house was in the same family all those years (Mabry's daughter married a Hazen and they bought the house from Mrs. Mabry after Mr Mabry's death in a gun fight). So, Mabry-Hazen house as from 1858 to 1987 a Mabry lived in the house and the furnishings are all from the family. However, not much of the furniture dates back to 1850s.   :o
 
The house built 1857 to 1858 and owned by of course a 1%'er (Joe Mabry II plantation and RR fortune).  It was built because his wife (he married Laura Churchwell in 1852) wanted a more airy place with a lot of natural light VS the plantation house on the river where they lived for several years. The plantation house was a massive place of brick construction, but was dark and damp per his wife.
 
Mabry was a confederate sympathizer and donated $100K (lot of money in those days) to the Confederate (like I said a 1%'er). However, when the Union occupied Knoxville, he signed an oath of loyalty to the Union (makes sense can't let business suffer over a cause :-)). The house was taken over by the Union. A Fort was built and Mabry Hill became the Eastern defense for the Union occupation.
 
Financial difficulty came after the war including a bad land deal in partnership with Tom O'Connor. Tom  was president of Mechanic's National Bank. Mabry and O'Connor had words over the business deal for sometime. Mabry also blamed O'Connor for death of Willie's (his son) by gun shot from Don Lusby  at a bar on Gay Street after an argument XMAS EVE, 1818. 
 
Anyway, words escalated to the point of I will kill you when I see you (me too if I see you first).
O'Connor came out of the bank OCT, 1882  with a shotgun and gunned down Mabry as he walked up Gay Street. As I understand it, Mabry's son (Joe III) went to the bank and had a shoot out with O'Connor (both were killed). Reckon things have not changed much since then now that everyone is carrying guns again. 
 
Anyway, 3 months after her Father's death, Alice Mabry married Mr. Hazen (thus we have Mabry - Hazen House). They purchased the house from Mrs. Mabry renovated the house. She lived with them as part of the deal (tour guide commented her life lasted a lot longer than they expected when the deal was made). 
 
Their daughter, Evelyn Hazen, was born in 1898. She entered U of TN at 15 years of age. Graduated and  worked for NY Times, came back to Knoxville and taught HS. Then worked as research assistant at U of TN. She never married and lived here until her death at 88 in 1987.
 
She made provisions to preserve the house and establish a museum and the doors opened in 1992.
 
SO NOW YOU KNOW as Much as I do. They give you a story when you enter the house and a sheet with the history (I summed it up above). 
 
PICTURE Story
 
Pictures of Information plaques at Parking Lot.

Location: Dandridge Ave is the eastbound road coming from Summit Hill after you cross James White Parkway. Turn off Dandridge to the North and go behind the house to parking (there are signs to guide you).

There is also a Civil War marker.

A sketch shows the house when used as Fort for East Side of Knoxville. There was an earthen burn around the property that was not visible to the attacking Rebels. Anyway, the Rebels decided against attacking the house due to fortifications and armament. NOTE: the absence of trees (seen in all the pictures of battles and fort areas). Trees were used for fires, building, and of course removed to allow defensive fire. 
 
OK - Let's do the House. You come to the side (North side of the house) from the parking lot.

Standing on the North porch looking North.  Eventually we walked down to the end (couple of houses and a great view of Knoxville). The property owned was like 4 miles in each direction (I think).

A small (very small) reenactment set up. Learned a lot from the Yankee about the Springfield Rifled
Muzzle Loader of the period (we walked down to their encampment later). 
 
The house faced West -- you enter on that side for the tour.
 
Greeted by a guide who gives the history speech (interesting - good job) and gives you a history sheet.
Note the staircase (more on that later). The floors are original (heart of pine). REMEMBER -- all furnitute is family furniture from years 1858 to 1987.

Mr Mabry -- guide thinks he looks like Charlton Heston (I agree there is a resemblance). 
 
Another closer picture of the stairway (more later). However, note the curve back up to the left and also steps straight ahead. The second stairs (to the left and ahead) go to the same floor level with 4 bedrooms and a sitting room (sitting room is at front of house where the stairs to the left take you). Interesting thing is all the bedrooms are on the same level and when doors are opened, you can make a loop thru the rooms without entering the stairway or hallway. Guide said she could see the children racoing around that loop.
 
Dowstairs Rooms (again REMEMBER the Furniture).
 
Front north side sitting room.

Front South side sitting room (I took two pictures and made a panorama ( a bit lopsided ).
 
Rear North side Music room. Two pictures from different angles show the whole room.
 
DANG It -- Picture I thought I took of Dinning Room (across hall to south of Music Room did not show up).
 
This picture is standing in hall between Music Room and Dinning Room looking thru a doorway that is an addition added to the house. NOTE: the bathroom area in back and the museum room to the left. 

Bathroom.

In the hallway leading out the back door (Bathroom is on left of that hallway) is a display of Silverware.
Amazing how everyone use to have Silverware and no one gives a DANG about it. Not that we all had a 1%'ers collection of silverware.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2017, 07:39:17 pm by PAULRIDES »
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)

Offline PAULRIDES

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PICTURE Story

I thought the staircase was unique (nothing real fancy, just unique in the way it doubles back to the left and also goes straight). The first picture taken at top of the stairs that went straight back down to first floor.

Second picture taken at top of stairs that doubled back to the left looking at the stairs that went straight (that be the back side or east side of the house).
 
Now you see the bedrooms (4 bedrooms) and can visualize with the doors open between adjoining bedrooms and doors open to the bedrooms it makes a nice race track for kids (all staying on the upper level of the stairs without going onto the hallway or staircase). BY THE WAY -- Bedrooms on each side of the house are separated by a small space (about 2 foot wide) and doors that can close for privacy.  NOTE: That space between rooms at rear left of the picture. 

The sitting room, sewing room, office is located on west side second floor at top of the stairs that went back to the left. 
 
That pretty well covers the house (except museum - later), so this is some of the grounds. Looking back at parking lot on left and North side of the house. 

Stopped to talk to the re enactors and look at an Officers Field Desk. Replica of one at a museum.
 
Looking further North at end of the property are two building (Guest and Caretakers buildings) and view of Knoxville from the porch (looking NW to NE).

Panorama of Knoxville looking NW to NE.
 
Some of the museum (mostly pictures of family and history about them). House suffered some wear
and tear (Mr Hazen died in 1932, various relatives lived there and finally Evelyn became a bit of a recluse). Landscaping was not as nice as now.

Typical of INFO displayed in the Museum. NOTE: Bottom is the Gun Fight INFO (close up next you can read).

Always, some gifts to buy.
 
I had not heard of the history of Pressed Glass, here it is.
 
« Last Edit: May 27, 2017, 07:47:26 pm by PAULRIDES »
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)

Offline PAULRIDES

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Turned out a nice day for Dollywood despite my pessimism (was not as hot as I expected and enjoyed the shows we have seen many times). However, Betty did not resist buying the Year Pass for an additional $46 each over the $5 Sevier County Days admission. So, it was a $102 visit.

PICTURE Story

We took in the Kingdom Heirs (Gospel Music) show first at 12:45PM.  Gotta love that Dennis doing introduction (he's a natural).

Typical Gospel Singers group (I say typical cause their is a tenor, lead, baritone, and a base in every group). Not many groups any better than these four. Not to be misunderstand, I like the music even thought I am not into the message.
 
We walked by the bakery on the way to the rest rooms -- HONEST, just walked by and took a picture. I am not dumb enough to pay $4.49 for a bakery.
 
Next show was at the Pines Theater (Dolly got her start at the Pines Theater in Sevierville) for the Dreamland production. Probably have seen this show 40 or 50 times over 19 years.  Kind of like it, but is does get old hat after awhile. It's kind of a memory show that starts out with a closed down Drive In restaurant where the kids hang out thru HS 1950s, College 1960s, early life 1970s. Then comes to life as an older Vietnam Vet returns to the closed theater. A little love story thrown in that gets sad with a separation (she leaves for a job after college) and then ends happy (they get back together in older age).
 
 
Then on to Dolly's My People show. We have seen this a dozen times, but always enjoy the interaction of Dolly (big screen) with the rest of those cast (really a great job of synching it).
Her brother and his daughter and two cousins were in the show - the rest are family for the day.
Niece (daughter of Randy), Randy, and two cousins that helped Dolly with her music.
 
Stopped by the Back Porch Theater for the last few minutes of the show their (good group wish we would have seen more of the show).
 
The last show we did was at 5PM (ended at 5:30PM) at the Valley Theater.
The Chicken Lady is a 'Ball of Fire' pre entertainment for about 10 minutes before the show.

The show is a group (shown) singing and dancing thru the Country Music History (classics and some new stuff).
Ride Country Roads - a lot. :-)